Ten Conservative Concerns with an Obamacare “Stability” Bill

A PDF version of this document is available online here.

1.     Taxpayer Funding of Abortion Coverage.             As Republicans themselves correctly argued back in 2010, any provision preventing taxpayer dollars from funding abortion coverage must occur in legislation itself—executive orders are by their nature insufficient. Therefore, any “stability” bill must have protections above and beyond current law to ensure that taxpayer dollars do not fund abortion coverage.

2.     Potential Budget Gimmick.       Press reports indicate that House Republican leaders have considered adjusting the budgetary baseline to fund a “stability” package. Congress should not attempt to violate existing law and create artificial “savings” to fund a reinsurance program.

3.     Insurers Still Owe the Treasury Billions.    The Government Accountability Office concluded in 2016 that the Obama Administration violated the law by prioritizing payments to insurers over payments to the U.S. Treasury. The Trump Administration and House Republicans should focus first on reclaiming the billions insurers haven’t repaid, rather than giving them more taxpayer cash in a “stability” package.

4.     Doesn’t Repeal Obamacare Now.        Instead of repealing the onerous regulations that caused health insurance rates to more than double from 2013-17, a “stability” bill would lower premiums by giving insurers additional subsidies—throwing money at a problem rather than fixing it.

5.     Undermines Obamacare Repeal Later.   House Republican leaders reportedly support a bill (H.R. 4666) by Rep. Ryan Costello (R-PA). That bill appropriates “stability” funds to insurers for three years (2019 through 2021), eliminating any incentive for the next Congress to consider “repeal-and-replace” legislation.

6.     Budgetary Cliff Opens Door to Perpetual Bailouts.    Whereas Obamacare’s reinsurance program phased out over three years—with funding of $10 billion in 2014, $6 billion in 2015, and $4 billion in 2016—H.R. 4666 contains $10 billion in funding for each of three years. This funding cliff would create a push for additional “stability” funding thereafter—turning the Costello bill into a perpetual bailout machine.

7.     Bails Out Insurers’ Bad Decisions.    During the period 2015-17, most insurers assumed they would continue to receive cost-sharing reduction (CSR) payments, despite growing legal challenges over their constitutionality. Before even considering appropriating CSR funds, Congress should first investigate insurers’ bad business decisions to assume unconstitutional payments would continue in perpetuity.

8.     Bails Out Insurance Commissioners’ Bad Decisions.    Likewise, in the summer and fall of 2016, virtually all state insurance commissioners failed to consider whether the incoming Administration would unilaterally withdraw CSR payments—which the Trump Administration did last year. Before making CSR payments, Congress first should investigate insurance commissioners’ gross negligence.

9.     Doesn’t Hold Obama Officials Accountable.        In 2016, the House Energy and Commerce and Ways and Means Committees released a 158-page report highlighting abuses over the unconstitutional appropriation of CSRs by the Obama Administration. Since then, neither committee has acted—contempt citations, criminal referrals, or other similar actions—to uphold Congress’ constitutional prerogatives.

10.  Could Undermine Second Amendment Rights.  Last week, health insurer Aetna made a sizable contribution to fund this month’s gun control march in Washington. Some may question why insurers need billions of dollars in taxpayer cash if they can contribute to liberal organizations, and whether some of this “stability” package will end up in the hands of groups opposed to Americans’ fundamental liberties.

Paul Ryan Flip-Flops on Fiscal Responsibility to Prop Up Obamacare

What a difference eight years makes. In February 2010, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI), then Ranking Member of the House Budget Committee, spoke at the White House health care summit decrying Obamacare as “a bill that is full of gimmicks and smoke-and-mirrors.” His comments became a viral sensation, so much so that the Wall Street Journal published a condensed version of his remarks as an op-ed. (Here’s the video.)

Reporters confirmed as much on Monday, when an article claimed that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) believes appropriating funds for cost-sharing reduction payments (CSRs) for three years would save the federal government $32 billion, when compared to a scenario in which Congress does not appropriate CSR payments. Not coincidentally, the article noted that a separate bill by Rep. Ryan Costello (R-PA) — “which House leaders have embraced” — would create a $30 billion “Stability Fund” for insurers, purportedly paid for by the $32 billion in “savings” caused from appropriating CSRs.

The article doesn’t say so outright, but it’s not hard to figure out what happened behind the scenes:

  1. House Republican leadership directed CBO to score the fiscal effects of making CSR payments to insurers compared to not making the payments.
  2. House Republican leaders leaked results of the score to insurer lobbyists.
  3. Those insurer lobbyists then leaked the results to reporters — to claim their bill would generate “savings” for the federal government.

The end result sounds like a Broadway musical: “How to Spend $60 Billion in Taxpayer Funds without Really Trying.” If insurers have their way, Congress would spend roughly $30 billion in CSR payments for the next three years, and that $30 billion in spending would “save” another $32 billion — which Congress would turn right around and send to insurers, via the $30 billion “Stability Fund.”

Compare this maneuver to Obamacare — or, more specifically, Paul Ryan’s 2010 critique of Obamacare. At the White House health care summit, Ryan told President Obama in regard to Obamacare’s proposed reductions to Medicare: “You can’t say that you’re using this money to either extend Medicare solvency and also offset the cost of this new program. That’s double counting.” If claiming that Medicare savings both enhance Medicare’s solvency and pay for Obamacare constitutes double counting — and it does — then what exactly is jiggering the budgetary baseline solely to generate “savings” that Republicans can turn around and spend…?

There’s another problem too: The fraudulent “savings” are also illegal. As I previously noted, the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings statute requires CBO to assume full payment of CSRs — meaning the scenario that House Republicans asked CBO to score violates the statutory requirements.

Some might claim that, since President Trump stopped making CSR payments last October, a scenario in which CBO does not assume the federal government makes those payments represents a more realistic fiscal approach than that currently required by Gramm-Rudman-Hollings. To which I have one simple retort: If you don’t like the law, then Change. The. Law.

Ryan and House Republican leaders don’t want to change the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings law — just like they don’t want to pay for the insurer bailout. Such efforts would take time and effort, necessitate legislative transparency — as opposed to closed-door meetings and selective leaks to K Street lobbyists — and require difficult decisions about how to pay for new spending. Why make those tough choices now, when Republicans can just charge the tab for the insurer bailout on to the national credit card, and let the next generation pay the bill instead?

Congressional Republicans spent eight years decrying Obamacare’s fiscal gimmickry, and President Obama’s executive lawlessness. If they follow the example of the House Republican leadership, and engage in their own illegal budgetary gimmicks, they will have no grounds to complain about Democrats’ spending sprees or overreach. And they shouldn’t be surprised if no one believes their claims of fiscal responsibility come November 6.

This post was originally published at The Federalist.

Aetna Gun Control Donation Epitomizes Crony Capitalism

Just when conservatives couldn’t find enough reasons to oppose an Obamacare “stability” package — or the law itself — the health insurance industry generated another. Aetna’s CEO Mark Bertolini announced Tuesday the company would donate $200,000 to support the March for Our Lives gun control rally scheduled for later this month.

Which raises an obvious question: If a company like Aetna can afford to make a six-figure contribution to a liberal gun control effort, why exactly did health insurers spend some of Tuesday asking for taxpayers to provide a multi-billion dollar “stability” package for the Exchanges?

And when it comes to taxpayer largesse, Aetna has already received plenty. According to page 56 of its most recent quarterly financial filing, last year Aetna’s revenue from government business outstripped its private-sector commercial enterprises: Even as private sector revenues dropped the past two years, government business rose by over $4.5 billion, due at least in part to the additional revenues generated by Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion.

As with other health insurers, Aetna has rapidly become an extension of the state itself — a regulated utility that focuses largely on extracting more business from government. Rather than focusing on new innovations and selling product to the private sector, it instead hires more lobbyists to seek rents (e.g., a “stability” package) from government. And in exchange for such governmental payments, it promotes liberal causes that will win the company plaudits from the statists who regulate it.

Other health insurance organizations have taken much the same tack. Several years ago, the House Ways and Means Committee exposed how AARP received numerous exemptions for its lucrative Medigap plans in Obamacare. Not coincidentally, the organization had previously used its “Divided We Fail” campaign to funnel money to such liberal organizations as the NAACP, the Human Rights Campaign, the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, and the National Council of La Raza.

(Yes, I recognize that, technically speaking, AARP is not a health insurer. Whereas health insurers might have to place money at risk, AARP faces no such barrier, and can instead reap pure profit by licensing its name and brand.)

On Twitter Thursday evening, I asked Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini if he considers abortion a public health issue — the company’s stated reason for contributing to the March for Our Lives. If Aetna purportedly cares so much about gun violence, it should similarly care about violence against the unborn. But I won’t hold my breath waiting for Aetna to contribute to the March for Life, or any other pro-life cause.

Mind you, a private company can make contributions to whichever organizations it likes or does not like. Unfortunately, however, Aetna and many other insurers aren’t acting like private companies. In constantly begging for taxpayer dollars, they’re acting like wards of the state.

That dynamic provides conservatives with the perfect reason to oppose an Obamacare “stability” package — and support the law’s full repeal. Weaning health insurers off the gusher of taxpayer dollars Obamacare created would represent a move away from the current statist status quo. And who knows? It might — just might — get some health care companies to look beyond government as the solution to all their problems.

This post was originally published at The Federalist.