A Retiree Health Care “Fix” That Isn’t

Since the Affordable Care Act became law in 2010, supporters and opponents have argued about whether the measure would lead employers to drop health coverage for workers. This issue has returned to the news; Wal-Mart recently decided to drop coverage for some of its part-time workers, and The Wall Street Journal reported this week that some firms, seeking to avoid employer penalties under the law, have encouraged employees to enroll in Medicaid.

While their private-sector counterparts have received more attention, public-sector employees–particularly retirees–could face similar problems with dropped coverage. The Atlantic reported last week on the trend of cities in financial distress, from Detroit to Chicago to Sheboygan, Wis., reducing or eliminating coverage and seeking to use the insurance exchanges to get out of their health-care obligations to retirees. As one pension expert quoted in the Atlantic noted, “every public-sector employer is looking at the exchanges as a potential way to get out of the unfunded liabilities that the public sector is bearing.”

But transferring state and municipal retirees to insurance plans on the exchanges doesn’t reduce the amount of unfunded liabilities; it shifts the cost from state and local governments to Washington. Many of the retirees in question could qualify for federal premium and cost-sharing subsidies for their exchange insurance policies. Even by Washington standards, the magnitude of the problem is daunting: A 2012 Pew study found that state governments held $627 billion in unfunded retiree health obligations; adding local government health plans could push those obligations toward $1 trillion.

State governments are grappling with a difficult revenue environment, while the federal government faces long-term fiscal challenges caused by demographic shifts. Given these dynamics, what looks to some mayors like a quick fix to their budget woes–shifting retirees to the federal exchanges–could, in the broader fiscal sense, amount to shifting deck chairs on the Titanic. If efforts by cities and states ultimately encourage private-sector firms to drop health coverage for their workers and retirees, they will add to our nation’s collective entitlement obligations—and could end up sinking our federal fiscal ship.

This post was originally published at the Wall Street Journal Think Tank blog.

Morning Bell: Obamacare’s Dirty Dozen Implementation Failures

Last week, the Obama Administration attempted to spin its announcement of a one-year delay in Obamacare’s employer mandate as an effort to implement the law “in a careful, thoughtful manner.” Don’t be fooled. Even Democrats have admitted the law has turned into a massive “train wreck,” with delays, glitches, and problems aplenty. Here are a dozen more Obamacare implementation failures.

1. The CLASS Act: ABANDONED, THEN REPEALED

One Democrat famously called this new long-term care entitlement “a Ponzi scheme of the first order, the kind of thing that Bernie Madoff would have been proud of”—and so it proved. In the fall of 2011, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) admitted CLASS could not be implemented in a fiscally sound manner—and Congress eventually repealed the program outright.

2. Exchanges: MISSED DEADLINES

Most states resisted Obamacare’s call to create insurance exchanges, choosing to let Washington create a federally run exchange instead. However, a Government Accountability Office report released last month noted that “critical” activities to create a federal exchange have not been completed, and the missed deadlines “suggest a potential for challenges going forward.”

3. HHS mandate: DELAYED; UNDER LEGAL CHALLENGE

Last year, the Administration announced a partial delay for Obamacare’s anti-conscience mandate. However, many employers have filed legal actions against the mandate, which forces them to fund products they find morally objectionable or pay massive fines.

4. Small business plan choice: DELAYED

The Administration announced in April that workers will not be able to choose plans from different health insurers in the small business exchanges next year—a delay that liberal blogger Joe Klein called “a really bad sign” of “Obamacare incompetence.”

5. Child-only plans: UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES

A drafting error in Obamacare has actually led to less access to care for children with pre-existing conditions. A 2011 report found that in 17 states, insurers are no longer selling child-only health insurance plans, because they fear that individuals will apply for coverage only after being diagnosed with a costly illness.

6. Basic health plan: DELAYED

This government-run plan for states, created as part of Obamacare, has also been delayed, prompting one Democrat to criticize the Administration for failing to “live up” to the law and implement it as written.

7. High-risk pools: UNDERPERFORMING; FUNDING LOW

This program for individuals with pre-existing conditions faced higher costs and lower enrollment than advertised. Though it was originally projected to cover up to 700,000 individuals, only about 110,000 have enrolled—yet the Administration had to halt new enrollment and take other radical measures to prevent the $5 billion program from running out of money.

8. Early retiree reinsurance: BROKE

The $5 billion in funding for this program was intended to last until 2014—but the program’s money ran out in 2011, two years ahead of schedule.

9. Waivers: UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES

After the law passed, HHS discovered that some of its new mandates would raise costs so much that employers would drop coverage rather than face skyrocketing premiums. Instead, the Administration announced a series of temporary waivers—and more than half the recipients of those waivers were members of union health insurance plans.

10. Co-ops: DEFUNDED

Congress blocked additional funding to this Obamacare program in January, and with good reason: In one case, a new health insurance co-op was called “fatally flawed” by Vermont’s state insurance commissioner.

11. “Employee free choice”: REPEALED

This provision, which would have allowed certain workers to use contributions from their employers to buy exchange health plans, was repealed in April 2011, as businesses considered it too complex and unworkable.

12. Medicaid expansion: REJECTED BY MANY STATES

Last year, the Supreme Court made Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion optional for states, ruling that Obamacare as written engaged in “economic dragooning” that puts “a gun to the head of states.” Many states are resisting Obamacare’s call to expand Medicaid, knowing that expansion will saddle them with additional, unsustainable costs.

As these examples demonstrate, it’s not just the employer mandate that’s flawed—it’s the entire law. Recognizing these myriad, massive failures, Congress should hold the line and refuse to spend a single dime on Obamacare implementation.

This post was originally published at The Daily Signal.

More Bad News for American Patients

Earlier this week consultants at Towers Watson, in conjunction with the National Business Group on Health, released their annual survey of large employers offering health insurance.  And the results are not encouraging for businesses or employees:

Higher Costs:  “Employers anticipate total health care costs will reach $11,664 per active employee in 2012, up from $10,982 in 2011 — a 6.2% increase in total costs over the period.”

Higher Premiums:  “Employees, on average, paid 23.0% of total premium costs in 2011 and are expected to pay 23.7% in 2012, as companies take steps to control their costs.  In paycheck deductions, this translated into an average employee contribution of $2,529 to premiums in 2011, which is expected to rise to $2,764 in 2012 — a 9.3% increase in one year.”

Higher Out-of-Pocket Charges:  “The share of total health care expenses paid by employees, including premium and out-of-pocket costs, is expected to be 34.4% in 2012, up from 33.2% in 2011.”

Employers Dropping Retiree Coverage:  “If [Obamacare] works as intended, the health insurance market in 2014 and beyond will become an attractive alternative and further push companies to exit sponsorship of their pre-65 programs.”

Employers Dropping Workers’ Coverage:  “Nearly one in five companies is likely to offer health care coverage to a subset of its workforce and direct the remainder of its employees to the insurance Exchanges.”

Employers Less Confident about Offering Coverage:  “Against the backdrop of [Obamacare], companies have never been more uncertain about the future of their health care programs over the long term….With the health care marketplace changing rapidly and parts of [Obamacare] already starting to take effect, employer confidence is at its lowest point (23%) since we began tracking this data.”

Businesses Bogged Down by Paperwork:  Nearly one in six firms (15%) cited the cost of Obamacare compliance as one of the “biggest challenges to maintaining affordable benefit coverage.”

Firms Reducing Employee Hours:  “Nearly 40% of companies that traditionally use a high number of part-time workers expect to limit them to less than 30 hours per week by 2014 to escape having to pay benefits.”

The report once again illustrates Obamacare’s broken promises – instead of premiums going down by $2,500, they continue to skyrocket, even as individuals are unable to maintain their prior coverage.  It’s yet another example of the way in which Obamacare has failed to deliver for the American people.

46 Reasons to Repeal an Unconstitutional Law NOW

46 50 Reasons to Repeal ALL of Obamacare NOW

Today the Supreme Court struck down portions of Obamacare as unconstitutional – states cannot be “dragooned” into expanding their Medicaid programs according to the law’s dictates. However, a list of 50 particularly onerous or egregious provisions in Obamacare (with sections from the statute duly noted) reveals just how much of this bad law remains. By the most generous interpretation, the Court struck down only four of the 50 egregious policies, illustrating why Congress should immediately repeal the entire measure once and for all. Among many other bad policies, the law:

  1. Imposes $800 billion in tax increases, including no fewer than 12 separate provisions breaking candidate Obama’s “firm pledge” during his campaign that he would not raise “any of your taxes” (Sections 9001-9016)
  2. Forces Americans to purchase a product for the first time ever (Section 1501)
  3. Creates a board of 15 unelected and unaccountable bureaucrats to make binding rulings on how to reduce Medicare spending (Section 3403)
  4. Pays over $800 billion in subsidies straight to health insurance companies (Sections 1401, 1402, and 1412)
  5. Requires all individuals to buy government-approved health insurance plans, imposing new mandates that will raise individual insurance premiums by an average of $2,100 per family (Section 1302)
  6. Forces seniors to lose their current health care, by enacting Medicare Advantage cuts that by 2017 will cut enrollment in half, and cut plan choices by two-thirds (Section 3201)
  7. Imposes a 40 percent tax on health benefits, a direct contradiction of Barack Obama’s campaign promises (Section 9001)
  8. Relies upon government bureaucrats to “issue guidance on best practices of plain language writing” (Section 1311(e)(3)(B))
  9. Provides special benefits to residents of Libby, Montana – home of Max Baucus, the powerful Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, who helped write the law even though he says he hasn’t read it (Section 10323)
  10. Imposes what a Democrat Governor called the “mother of all unfunded mandates” – new, Washington-dictated requirements of at least $118 billion – at a time when states already face budget deficits totaling a collective $175 billion (Section 2001)
  11. Imposes reductions in Medicare spending that, according to the program’s non-partisan actuary, would cause 40 percent of all Medicare providers to become unprofitable, and could lead to their exit from the program (Section 3401)
  12. Raises premiums on more than 17 million seniors participating in Medicare Part D, so that Big Pharma can benefit from its “rock-solid deal” struck behind closed doors with President Obama and Congressional Democrats (Section 3301)
  13. Creates an institute to undertake research that, according to one draft Committee report prepared by Democrats, could mean that “more expensive [treatments] will no longer be prescribed” (Section 6301)
  14. Creates a multi-billion dollar “slush fund” doled out solely by federal bureaucrats, which has already been used to fund things like bike paths (Section 4002)
  15. Subjects states to myriad new lawsuits, by forcing them to assume legal liability for delivering services to Medicaid patients for the first time in that program’s history (Section 2304)
  16. Permits taxpayer dollars to flow to health plans that fund abortion, in a sharp deviation from prior practice under Democrat and Republican Administrations (Section 1303)
  17. Empowers bureaucrats on a board that has ruled against mammograms and against prostate cancer screenings to make binding determinations about what types of preventive services should be covered (Sections 2713 and 4104)
  18. Precludes poor individuals from having a choice of health care plans by automatically dumping them in the Medicaid program (Section 1413(a))
  19. Creates a new entitlement program that one Democrat called “a Ponzi scheme of the first order, the kind of thing that Bernie Madoff would have been proud of” – a scheme so unsustainable even the Administration was forced to admit it would not work (Section 8002)
  20. Provides $5 billion in taxpayer dollars to a fund that has largely served to bail out unions and other organizations who made unsustainable health care promises to retirees that they cannot afford (Section 1102)
  21. Creates a tax credit so convoluted it requires seven different worksheets to determine eligibility (Section 1421)
  22. Imposes multiple penalties on those who marry, by reducing subsidies (and increasing taxes) for married couples when compared to two individuals cohabiting together (Sections 1401-02)
  23. Extends the Medicare “payroll tax” to unearned income for the first time ever, including new taxes on the sale of some homes (Section 1402)
  24. Impedes state flexibility by requiring Medicaid programs to offer a specific package of benefits, including benefits like family planning services (Sections 2001(a)(2), 2001(c), 1302(b), and 2303(c))
  25. Requires individuals to go to the doctor and get a prescription in order to spend their own Flexible Spending Account money on over-the-counter medicines (Section 9003)
  26. Expands the definition of “low-income” to make 63 percent of non-elderly Americans eligible for “low-income” subsidized insurance (Section 1401)
  27. Imposes a new tax on the makers of goods like pacemakers and hearing aids (Section 9009)
  28. Creates an insurance reimbursement scheme that could result in the federal government obtaining Americans’ medical records (Section 1343)
  29. Permits states to make individuals presumptively eligible for Medicaid for unlimited 60-day periods, thus allowing any individual to receive taxpayer-funded assistance ad infinitum (Section 2303(b))
  30. Allows individuals to purchase insurance on government exchanges – and to receive taxpayer-funded insurance subsidies – WITHOUT verifying their identity as American citizens (Section 1411)
  31. Gives $300 million in higher Medicaid reimbursements to one state as part of the infamous “Louisiana Purchase” – described by ABC News as “what…it take[s] to get a wavering senator to vote for health care reform” (Section 2006)
  32. Raises taxes on firms who cannot afford to buy coverage for their workers (Section 1513)
  33. Forces younger Americans to pay double-digit premium increases so that older workers can pay slightly less (Section 1201)
  34. Prohibits states from modifying their Medicaid programs to include things like modest anti-fraud protections (Section 2001)
  35. Includes a special provision increasing federal payments just for Tennessee (Section 1203(b))
  36. Allows individuals to purchase health insurance across state lines – but only if politicians and bureaucrats agree to allow citizens this privilege (Section 1333)
  37. Allows the HHS Secretary and federal bureaucrats to grant waivers exempting people from Obamacare’s onerous mandates, over half of which have gone to members of union plans (Section 1001)
  38. Creates a pseudo-government-run plan overseen by the federal government (Section 1334)
  39. Removes a demonstration project designed to force government-run Medicare to compete on a level playing field with private plans (Section 1102(f))
  40. Gives the Secretary of HHS an UNLIMITED amount of federal funds to spend funding state insurance Exchanges (Section 1311(a))
  41. Creates a grant program that could be used by liberal groups like ACORN or AARP to conduct “public education activities” surrounding Obamacare (Section 1311(i))
  42. Applies new federal mandates to pre-Obamacare insurance policies, thus proving that you CAN’T keep the insurance plan you had – and liked – before the law passed (Sections 2301 and 10103)
  43. Prohibits individuals harmed by federal bureaucrats from challenging those decisions, either in court or through regulatory processes (Sections 3001, 3003, 3007, 3008, 3021, 3022, 3025, 3133, 3403, 5501, 6001, and 6401)
  44. Earmarks $100 million for “construction of a health care facility,” a “sweetheart deal” inserted by a Democrat Senator trying to win re-election (Section 10502)
  45. Puts yet another Medicaid unfunded mandate on states, by raising payments to primary care physicians, but only for two years, forcing states to come up with another method of funding this unsustainable promise when federal funding expires (Section 1202)
  46. Imposes price controls that have had the effect of costing jobs in the short time since they were first implemented (Section 1001)
  47. Prohibits individuals from spending federal insurance subsidies outside government-approved Exchanges (Section 1401(a))
  48. Provides a special increase in federal hospital payments just for Hawaii (Section 10201(e)(1))
  49. Imposes new reporting requirements that will cost businesses millions of dollars, and affect thousands of restaurants and other establishments across the country (Section 4205)
  50. Codifies 159 new boards, bureaucracies, and programs

The Supreme Court may have struck some of these onerous provisions, but the only way to ensure that ALL these provisions are eliminated – and never return – is to repeal ALL of this unconstitutional law immediately.

Key Points from Today’s Medicare Trustees Report

The official Medicare trustees report has now been posted online here.  Here’s a quick take about what you need to know in the report:

  1. Insolvency One Year Closer:  Contrary to predictions made in this space this morning, the insolvency date for the Medicare Hospital Insurance Trust Fund remains at 2024 – despite the 2% sequester cuts scheduled to take effect beginning in January.  In other words, if not for the sequester cuts insisted on by Congress, Medicare’s financial stability would have deteriorated even further.  As it is, we’re still one year closer to Medicare running out of IOUs to cash in to pay its bills (see #3 below).
  2. Obama Economy Making It Worse:  As the Associated Press noted, “Social Security’s finances worsened” – and Medicare’s finances did not improve, sequester notwithstanding – “in part because high energy prices suppressed wages, a trend the trustees see as continuing.  The trustees said they expect workers to work fewer hours than previously projected, even after the economy recovers.”  President Obama’s poor economic record is not only harming workers today, it will harm future generations – seniors in current entitlement programs that are less secure, and children and grandchildren forced to pay the bills for skyrocketing spending – for decades to come.
  3. Deficits as Far as the Eye Can See:  The report once again confirms that the Medicare program is already contributing to the federal deficit, will continue to do so throughout the coming decade, and forever thereafter.  Since 2008, the program has run cash flow deficits; this year’s deficit is expected to total $28.9 billion.  The only thing keeping the program afloat financially is the sale of Treasury bonds in the Medicare Trust Fund – and the redemption of those paper IOUs increases the federal deficit.
  4. Funding Warning:  For the seventh straight year, the trustees issued a funding warning showing that the Medicare program is taking a disproportionate share of its funding from general revenues, thus crowding out programs like defense and education.  While in theory this development should prompt the President to follow his statutory requirement to submit legislation remedying this funding shortfall, the White House has previously refused to do so – relying instead on a signing statement by President Bush to ignore the need for Medicare reform (and also breaking the President’s campaign promises in the process).
  5. Unrealistic Assumptions:  For the third straight year since the passage of Obamacare, the report features a statement of actuarial opinion by the non-partisan Medicare actuary (pages 277-279 of the report), who says “the financial projections shown in this report…do not represent a reasonable expectation for actual program operations.”  The actuary will again issue an alternative scenario for Medicare’s unfunded obligations that he views as more realistic, because the major source of Medicare payment reductions in Obamacare may not be sustained over a long period of time.
  6. Double Counting:  The actuary also previously confirmed that the Medicare reductions in Obamacare “cannot be simultaneously used to finance other federal outlays and to extend the [Medicare] trust fund” solvency date – rendering dubious any potential claims that Obamacare will extend Medicare’s solvency.  As Speaker Pelosi admitted last year, Democrats “took a half a trillion dollars out of Medicare in [Obamacare], the health care bill” – and you can’t improve Medicare’s solvency by taking money out of the program.
  7. Massive Tax Increases:  Today’s report again confirms that Medicare’s finances are also being bolstered by the extension of the health care law’s “high-income” tax – which is NOT indexed for inflation – to more and more individuals over time.  Page 30 of the report notes that “by the end of the long-range projection period, an estimated 80 percent of workers would pay the higher tax rate.”  As JEC recently reported, these tax increases are part of the $4 trillion in “revenue enhancements” over the next 25 years taking place thanks to Obamacare.  When Democrats talk about raising taxes to reduce the deficit, keep in mind that they have already raised taxes in a way that will harm middle-class families over time – and that those tax increases were used not to reduce the deficit but to pay for new and unsustainable entitlements.
  8. Seniors Losing Coverage, Part I:  Table IV.C1 of the report notes that millions of seniors will lose their current Medicare Advantage plans – enrollment is projected to fall from 13.5 million this year to 9.7 million by 2017.  However, thanks to the waiver/demonstration program announced by the Administration, and criticized by the Government Accountability Office in a report this morning, enrollment in Medicare Advantage will not begin falling until after the President has completed his re-election campaign.
  9. Seniors Losing Coverage, Part II:  Table IV.B10 of the report re-stated prior projections that enrollment in employer-sponsored retiree drug plans will fall from 6.8 million in 2010 to a mere 800,000 by 2016 – a drop of nearly 90%.  This rapid decrease in enrollment occurs thanks to provisions in Obamacare that raise taxes on employers who continue to offer retiree drug coverage.

 

Unfunded Obligation Projections for 75-Year Budget Window (2012-2086)

  2009 Trustees’ Report pre-Obamacare

(in trillions)

2011 Trustees’ Report (in trillions) 2011 Alternative Scenario (in trillions) 2012 Trustees’ Report (in trillions) 2012 Alternative Scenario (in trillions)
Part A (Hospital Insurance) $13.4 (1.7% of GDP) $3.0 (0.3% of GDP) $8.3 (0.9% of GDP) $4.8 (0.3% of GDP) Not Yet Released
Part B (Obligations less beneficiary premiums) $17.2 (2.2% of GDP) $13.9 (1.6% of GDP) $21.0 (2.4% of GDP) $14.8 (1.6% of GDP) Not Yet Released
Part D (Obligations less beneficiary premiums and state “clawback” payments) $7.2 (0.9% of GDP) $7.5 (0.8% of GDP) $7.5 (0.8% of GDP) $6.8 (0.7% of GDP) Not Yet Released
TOTAL $37.8 (4.8% of GDP) $24.4 (2.8% of GDP) $36.8 (4.2% of GDP) $26.4 (2.9% of GDP) Not Yet Released

 

Survey Shows How Obamacare Is Making Things Worse

Lost in all the publicity surrounding the two-year anniversary of Obamacare and the Supreme Court arguments regarding same was an interesting study revealing once again how the 2700-page law has fallen short.  The annual Towers Watson survey of health plans, released last month, again showed how the law is harming millions of Americans this year, and causing more employers to think about dropping coverage in the future:

Higher Costs:  Costs per employee will rise by $682 this year – imposing new costs on struggling businesses and families alike.  Costs would have risen even higher, but for the fact that employers also increased cost-sharing and made other plan changes.

Higher Premiums:  The employee share of premium costs will go up by 9.4%.  Recall that candidate Obama promised repeatedly that premiums would go DOWN by $2,500 per family under his plan.

Higher Cost-Sharing:  Out-of-pocket expenses for employees increased from 16% to 18%, and the total employee cost share (premiums plus out-of-pocket costs) also rose, from 33.2% to 34.4%.

Higher Regulatory Burden:  More than one in seven (15%) employers listed the cost of compliance and regulatory burdens under Obamacare as one of the biggest challenges to maintaining affordable coverage.

Lower Hours for Workers:  “Nearly 40% of companies that traditionally use a high number of part-time workers expect to limit them to less than 30 hours per week by 2014 to escape having to pay benefits.”

Employers Dumping Coverage, Part I:  Fewer than one in four (23%) employers said they are very confident they will continue to offer health benefits for the next ten years – that’s a drop of a whopping fifty points from the 73% number who planned to keep offering coverage five years ago.

Employers Dumping Coverage, Part II:  More than two in five (42%) employers are at least somewhat likely to direct part-time and temporary workers into Exchanges.

Employers Dumping Coverage, Part III:  More than two in five (41%) employers are at least somewhat likely to “structure [employer health insurance] contributions to facilitate availability of federal subsidies in the Exchange for low-wage earners.”

Employers Dumping Coverage, Part IV:  A majority (53%) of employers plan to eliminate retiree drug coverage by 2014 or 2015, sending their retirees into taxpayer-funded plans instead.

The results of the Towers Watson survey once again illustrate how Obamacare has failed to control costs, produced new and costly mandates for businesses, and thereby encouraged firms to dump their health coverage once Exchanges come online in 2014.  In short, the unpopular law has made things worse for millions of struggling Americans.

Obamacare ALREADY a Failure

The liberal Center for American Progress today released a one-pager attempting to claim that Obamacare is already a success.  In reality, however, the law’s many flaws have become more manifest with each passing day:

Premiums Higher and Higher:  Candidate Obama said repeatedly his bill would CUT premiums by an average of $2,500 per family – meaning premiums would go DOWN, not merely just “go up by less than projected.”  The campaign also promised that that those reductions would occur within Obama’s first term.  However, the annual Kaiser Foundation survey of employer-provided insurance found that average family premiums totaled $12,860 in 2008, $13,375 in 2009, and $13,770 in 2010 and $15,073 this year.  In other words, while candidate Obama promised premiums would fall by $2,500 on average, premiums have already risen by $2,213 during the Obama Administration.

Millions Losing Coverage:  The Galen Institute last month released a paper discussing the havoc Obamacare is wreaking on insurance markets, and specifically the insurance many Americans had – and liked – before the massive 2700 page law was passed.  Dozens of carriers have left insurance markets, or gone out of business altogether – leaving millions in the lurch.  And millions more will lose their coverage; under the Administration’s own estimates, more than half of all employers – and up to 80% of small businesses – will lose their pre-Obamacare coverage by next year.

Millions More Exempted:  According to the latest data, the Administration has now granted waivers to over 1,700 health plans with more than 4 million people – more than half of them participants in union plans.  The fact that the Administration feels the need to exempt millions from the law’s mandates shows how onerous they are.  Even Democrat Senators have admitted the law is flawed – five Senators wrote to the Administration asking for another Obamacare waiver, because the law “may cause disruption for farmers and others in the agricultural sector” by causing members of farmer co-operatives to lose their current coverage.

Higher Taxes:  Several middle-class tax increases related to Obamacare have already taken effect: new restrictions on FSAs and Health Savings Accounts, and Obamacare’s first tax increase, on tanning products, which took effect in July 2010.  And in just a few months, more new taxes will take effect – including taxes on medical products and industries, which the Congressional Budget Office and other outside experts agree will be passed on to consumers, raising insurance premiums by as much as $5000 per family over a decade.  These taxes are collectively having an effect; in November, device manufacturer Stryker announced that it would be shedding “five percent of its workforce over concerns about the impending 2.3 percent medical device tax prescribed by” Obamacare.

Economic Uncertainty:  Multiple quotes from business executives have proven how Obamacare’s uncertainty is hampering economic recovery.  Analysts at UBS have stated that Obamacare is “arguably the biggest impediment to hiring, particularly hiring of less skilled workers.”  And the President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta admitted he has “frequently heard strong comments to the effect of ‘my company won’t hire a single additional worker until we know what health insurance costs are going to be.’”

One Bailout Program Bankrupt:  Last month the Administration admitted that Obamacare’s early retiree reinsurance program would shut down at the end of 2011.  The program was scheduled to run through 2014, but ran out of money years ahead of schedule.  The program went broke because unions and state governments rushed to the federal government to receive subsidies; HHS data indicate that more than half of the money went to only 24 organizations – with the biggest recipient being the United Auto Workers union.

Another Unsound Program Ended Before It Began:  In October, HHS finally admitted that the CLASS Act long-term care program was actuarially and fiscally unsound, and decided not to go forward with the program.  This development should shock no one – the Medicare actuary said on Day One the plan would not work, and one Democrat Senator called CLASS a “Ponzi scheme of the first order.”  But the Administration was forced to admit that its sanctimonious claims that CLASS was not a “business-as-usual Washington gimmick” were utterly FALSE.

Burdens Crushing States:  Last month’s annual State Expenditure Report released by the National Association of State Budget Officers illustrated how Medicaid is a large – and rapidly growing – portion of state budgets.  Yet at a time when states face budget deficits totaling a collective $175 billion, Obamacare is imposing new unfunded mandates of at least $118 billion.  These burdens have forced states to spend money on Medicaid that could otherwise be used to improve education, transportation, corrections, or other priority areas.

Nearly two years ago, Speaker Pelosi famously said we had to pass the bill to find out what’s in it.   All the signs above show how the American people are not liking what they’ve found in the 2700-page health care law.

208 Things in Obamacare that Obama and Democrats Support

Last week, former HELP Committee staffer John McDonough wrote a list of “50 provisions I ask the media to ask Romney et al. if they are committed to repealing as President.”  McDonough noted that “there are [Obamacare] provisions opponents could pick out to create an alternative list for elimination.”

We here at RPC know a challenge when we hear one; our list is submitted below, with sections from the statute duly noted.  Remember when reading this list:  We KNOW that President Obama and Democrats all support these provisions in Obamacare – because they all voted to enact them into law.  So members of the media can readily ask President Obama and Democrat Members of Congress why they supported a law that…

  1. Imposes $800 billion in tax increases, including no fewer than 12 separate provisions breaking candidate Obama’s “firm pledge” during his campaign that he would not raise “any of your taxes” (Sections 9001-9016)?
  2. Forces Americans to purchase a product for the first time ever (Section 1501)?
  3. Creates a board of 15 unelected and unaccountable bureaucrats to make binding rulings on how to reduce Medicare spending (Section 3403)?
  4. Pays over $800 billion in subsidies straight to health insurance companies (Sections 1401, 1402, and 1412)?
  5. Requires all individuals to buy government-approved health insurance plans, imposing new mandates that will raise individual insurance premiums by an average of $2,100 per family (Section 1302)?
  6. Forces seniors to lose their current health care, by enacting Medicare Advantage cuts that by 2017 will cut enrollment in half, and cut plan choices by two-thirds (Section 3201)?
  7. Imposes a 40 percent tax on health benefits, a direct contradiction of Barack Obama’s campaign promises (Section 9001)?
  8. Relies upon government bureaucrats to “issue guidance on best practices of plain language writing” (Section 1311(e)(3)(B))?
  9. Provides special benefits to residents of Libby, Montana – home of Max Baucus, the powerful Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, who helped write the law even though he says he hasn’t read it (Section 10323)?
  10. Imposes what a Democrat Governor called the “mother of all unfunded mandates” – new, Washington-dictated requirements of at least $118 billion – at a time when states already face budget deficits totaling a collective $175 billion (Section 2001)?
  11. Imposes reductions in Medicare spending that, according to the program’s non-partisan actuary, would cause 40 percent of all Medicare providers to become unprofitable, and could lead to their exit from the program (Section 3401)?
  12. Raises premiums on more than 17 million seniors participating in Medicare Part D, so that Big Pharma can benefit from its “rock-solid deal” struck behind closed doors with President Obama and Congressional Democrats (Section 3301)?
  13. Creates an institute to undertake research that, according to one draft Committee report prepared by Democrats, could mean that “more expensive [treatments] will no longer be prescribed” (Section 6301)?
  14. Creates a multi-billion dollar “slush fund” doled out solely by federal bureaucrats, which has already been used to fund things like bike paths (Section 4002)?
  15. Subjects states to myriad new lawsuits, by forcing them to assume legal liability for delivering services to Medicaid patients for the first time in that program’s history (Section 2304)?
  16. Permits taxpayer dollars to flow to health plans that fund abortion, in a sharp deviation from prior practice under Democrat and Republican Administrations (Section 1303)?
  17. Empowers bureaucrats on a board that has ruled against mammograms and against prostate cancer screenings to make binding determinations about what types of preventive services should be covered (Sections 2713 and 4104)?
  18. Precludes poor individuals from having a choice of health care plans by automatically dumping them in the Medicaid program (Section 1413(a))?
  19. Creates a new entitlement program that one Democrat called “a Ponzi scheme of the first order, the kind of thing that Bernie Madoff would have been proud of” – a scheme so unsustainable even the Administration was forced to admit it would not work (Section 8002)?
  20. Provides $5 billion in taxpayer dollars to a fund that has largely served to bail out unions and other organizations who made unsustainable health care promises to retirees that they cannot afford (Section 1102)?
  21. Creates a tax credit so convoluted it requires seven different worksheets to determine eligibility (Section 1421)?
  22. Imposes multiple penalties on those who marry, by reducing subsidies (and increasing taxes) for married couples when compared to two individuals cohabiting together (Sections 1401-02)?
  23. Extends the Medicare “payroll tax” to unearned income for the first time ever, including new taxes on the sale of some homes (Section 1402)?
  24. Impedes state flexibility by requiring Medicaid programs to offer a specific package of benefits, including benefits like family planning services (Sections 2001(a)(2), 2001(c), 1302(b), and 2303(c))?
  25. Requires individuals to go to the doctor and get a prescription in order to spend their own Flexible Spending Account money on over-the-counter medicines (Section 9003)?
  26. Expands the definition of “low-income” to make 63 percent of non-elderly Americans eligible for “low-income” subsidized insurance (Section 1401)?
  27. Imposes a new tax on the makers of goods like pacemakers and hearing aids (Section 9009)?
  28. Creates an insurance reimbursement scheme that could result in the federal government obtaining Americans’ medical records (Section 1343)?
  29. Permits states to make individuals presumptively eligible for Medicaid for unlimited 60-day periods, thus allowing any individual to receive taxpayer-funded assistance ad infinitum (Section 2303(b))?
  30. Allows individuals to purchase insurance on government exchanges – and to receive taxpayer-funded insurance subsidies – WITHOUT verifying their identity as American citizens (Section 1411)?
  31. Gives $300 million in higher Medicaid reimbursements to one state as part of the infamous “Louisiana Purchase” – described by ABC News as “what…it take[s] to get a wavering senator to vote for health care reform” (Section 2006)?
  32. Raises taxes on firms who cannot afford to buy coverage for their workers (Section 1513)?
  33. Forces younger Americans to pay double-digit premium increases so that older workers can pay slightly less (Section 1201)?
  34. Prohibits states from modifying their Medicaid programs to include things like modest anti-fraud protections (Section 2001)?
  35. Includes a special provision increasing federal payments just for Tennessee (Section 1203(b))?
  36. Allows individuals to purchase health insurance across state lines – but only if politicians and bureaucrats agree to allow citizens this privilege (Section 1333)?
  37. Allows the HHS Secretary and federal bureaucrats to grant waivers exempting people from Obamacare’s onerous mandates, over half of which have gone to members of union plans (Section 1001)?
  38. Creates a pseudo-government-run plan overseen by the federal government (Section 1334)?
  39. Removes a demonstration project designed to force government-run Medicare to compete on a level playing field with private plans (Section 1102(f))?
  40. Gives the Secretary of HHS an UNLIMITED amount of federal funds to spend funding state insurance Exchanges (Section 1311(a))?
  41. Creates a grant program that could be used by liberal groups like ACORN or AARP to conduct “public education activities” surrounding Obamacare (Section 1311(i))?
  42. Applies new federal mandates to pre-Obamacare insurance policies, thus proving that you CAN’T keep the insurance plan you had – and liked – before the law passed (Sections 2301 and 10103)?
  43. Prohibits individuals harmed by federal bureaucrats from challenging those decisions, either in court or through regulatory processes (Sections 3001, 3003, 3007, 3008, 3021, 3022, 3025, 3133, 3403, 5501, 6001, AND 6401)?
  44. Earmarks $100 million for “construction of a health care facility,” a “sweetheart deal” inserted by a Democrat Senator trying to win re-election (Section 10502)?
  45. Puts yet another Medicaid unfunded mandate on states, by raising payments to primary care physicians, but only for two years, forcing states to come up with another method of funding this unsustainable promise when federal funding expires (Section 1202)?
  46. Imposes price controls that have had the effect of costing jobs in the short time since they were first implemented (Section 1001)?
  47. Prohibits individuals from spending federal insurance subsidies outside government-approved Exchanges (Section 1401(a))?
  48. Provides a special increase in federal hospital payments just for Hawaii (Section 10201(e)(1))?
  49. Imposes new reporting requirements that will cost businesses millions of dollars, and affect thousands of restaurants and other establishments across the country (Section 4205)?

And instead of including a 50th item on our list, we’re going to include 159 separate items.  These are the 159 new boards, bureaucracies, and programs created by Obamacare.  You can find the list below, or here.

No matter which way you look at it, this list provides 208 easy reasons why the American people still continue to reject Democrats’ unpopular 2700-page health care law.

 

Obamacare’s 159 New Boards, Bureaucracies, Commissions, and Programs

  1. Grant program for consumer assistance offices (Section 1002, p. 37)
  2. Grant program for states to monitor premium increases (Section 1003, p. 42)
  3. Committee to review administrative simplification standards (Section 1104, p. 71)
  4. Demonstration program for state wellness programs (Section 1201, p. 93)
  5. Grant program to establish state Exchanges (Section 1311(a), p. 130)
  6. State American Health Benefit Exchanges (Section 1311(b), p. 131)
  7. Exchange grants to establish consumer navigator programs (Section 1311(i), p. 150)
  8. Grant program for state cooperatives (Section 1322, p. 169)
  9. Advisory board for state cooperatives (Section 1322(b)(3), p. 173)
  10. Private purchasing council for state cooperatives (Section 1322(d), p. 177)
  11. State basic health plan programs (Section 1331, p. 201)
  12. State-based reinsurance program (Section 1341, p. 226)
  13. Program of risk corridors for individual and small group markets (Section 1342, p. 233)
  14. Program to determine eligibility for Exchange participation (Section 1411, p. 267)
  15. Program for advance determination of tax credit eligibility (Section 1412, p. 288)
  16. Grant program to implement health IT enrollment standards (Section 1561, p. 370)
  17. Federal Coordinated Health Care Office for dual eligible beneficiaries (Section 2602, p. 512)
  18. Medicaid quality measurement program (Section 2701, p. 518)
  19. Medicaid health home program for people with chronic conditions, and grants for planning same (Section 2703, p. 524)
  20. Medicaid demonstration project to evaluate bundled payments (Section 2704, p. 532)
  21. Medicaid demonstration project for global payment system (Section 2705, p. 536)
  22. Medicaid demonstration project for accountable care organizations (Section 2706, p. 538)
  23. Medicaid demonstration project for emergency psychiatric care (Section 2707, p. 540)
  24. Grant program for delivery of services to individuals with postpartum depression (Section 2952(b), p. 591)
  25. State allotments for grants to promote personal responsibility education programs (Section 2953, p. 596)
  26. Medicare value-based purchasing program (Section 3001(a), p. 613)
  27. Medicare value-based purchasing demonstration program for critical access hospitals (Section 3001(b), p. 637)
  28. Medicare value-based purchasing program for skilled nursing facilities (Section 3006(a), p. 666)
  29. Medicare value-based purchasing program for home health agencies (Section 3006(b), p. 668)
  30. Interagency Working Group on Health Care Quality (Section 3012, p. 688)
  31. Grant program to develop health care quality measures (Section 3013, p. 693)
  32. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Section 3021, p. 712)
  33. Medicare shared savings program (Section 3022, p. 728)
  34. Medicare pilot program on payment bundling (Section 3023, p. 739)
  35. Independence at home medical practice demonstration program (Section 3024, p. 752)
  36. Program for use of patient safety organizations to reduce hospital readmission rates (Section 3025(b), p. 775)
  37. Community-based care transitions program (Section 3026, p. 776)
  38. Demonstration project for payment of complex diagnostic laboratory tests (Section 3113, p. 800)
  39. Medicare hospice concurrent care demonstration project (Section 3140, p. 850)
  40. Independent Payment Advisory Board (Section 3403, p. 982)
  41. Consumer Advisory Council for Independent Payment Advisory Board (Section 3403, p. 1027)
  42. Grant program for technical assistance to providers implementing health quality practices (Section 3501, p. 1043)
  43. Grant program to establish interdisciplinary health teams (Section 3502, p. 1048)
  44. Grant program to implement medication therapy management (Section 3503, p. 1055)
  45. Grant program to support emergency care pilot programs (Section 3504, p. 1061)
  46. Grant program to promote universal access to trauma services (Section 3505(b), p. 1081)
  47. Grant program to develop and promote shared decision-making aids (Section 3506, p. 1088)
  48. Grant program to support implementation of shared decision-making (Section 3506, p. 1091)
  49. Grant program to integrate quality improvement in clinical education (Section 3508, p. 1095)
  50. Health and Human Services Coordinating Committee on Women’s Health (Section 3509(a), p. 1098)
  51. Centers for Disease Control Office of Women’s Health (Section 3509(b), p. 1102)
  52. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Office of Women’s Health (Section 3509(e), p. 1105)
  53. Health Resources and Services Administration Office of Women’s Health (Section 3509(f), p. 1106)
  54. Food and Drug Administration Office of Women’s Health (Section 3509(g), p. 1109)
  55. National Prevention, Health Promotion, and Public Health Council (Section 4001, p. 1114)
  56. Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health (Section 4001(f), p. 1117)
  57. Prevention and Public Health Fund (Section 4002, p. 1121)
  58. Community Preventive Services Task Force (Section 4003(b), p. 1126)
  59. Grant program to support school-based health centers (Section 4101, p. 1135)
  60. Grant program to promote research-based dental caries disease management (Section 4102, p. 1147)
  61. Grant program for States to prevent chronic disease in Medicaid beneficiaries (Section 4108, p. 1174)
  62. Community transformation grants (Section 4201, p. 1182)
  63. Grant program to provide public health interventions (Section 4202, p. 1188)
  64. Demonstration program of grants to improve child immunization rates (Section 4204(b), p. 1200)
  65. Pilot program for risk-factor assessments provided through community health centers (Section 4206, p. 1215)
  66. Grant program to increase epidemiology and laboratory capacity (Section 4304, p. 1233)
  67. Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (Section 4305, p. 1238)
  68. National Health Care Workforce Commission (Section 5101, p. 1256)
  69. Grant program to plan health care workforce development activities (Section 5102(c), p. 1275)
  70. Grant program to implement health care workforce development activities (Section 5102(d), p. 1279)
  71. Pediatric specialty loan repayment program (Section 5203, p. 1295)
  72. Public Health Workforce Loan Repayment Program (Section 5204, p. 1300)
  73. Allied Health Loan Forgiveness Program (Section 5205, p. 1305)
  74. Grant program to provide mid-career training for health professionals (Section 5206, p. 1307)
  75. Grant program to fund nurse-managed health clinics (Section 5208, p. 1310)
  76. Grant program to support primary care training programs (Section 5301, p. 1315)
  77. Grant program to fund training for direct care workers (Section 5302, p. 1322)
  78. Grant program to develop dental training programs (Section 5303, p. 1325)
  79. Demonstration program to increase access to dental health care in underserved communities (Section 5304, p. 1331)
  80. Grant program to promote geriatric education centers (Section 5305, p. 1334)
  81. Grant program to promote health professionals entering geriatrics (Section 5305, p. 1339)
  82. Grant program to promote training in mental and behavioral health (Section 5306, p. 1344)
  83. Grant program to promote nurse retention programs (Section 5309, p. 1354)
  84. Student loan forgiveness for nursing school faculty (Section 5311(b), p. 1360)
  85. Grant program to promote positive health behaviors and outcomes (Section 5313, p. 1364)
  86. Public Health Sciences Track for medical students (Section 5315, p. 1372)
  87. Primary Care Extension Program to educate providers (Section 5405, p. 1404)
  88. Grant program for demonstration projects to address health workforce shortage needs (Section 5507, p. 1442)
  89. Grant program for demonstration projects to develop training programs for home health aides (Section 5507, p. 1447)
  90. Grant program to establish new primary care residency programs (Section 5508(a), p. 1458)
  91. Program of payments to teaching health centers that sponsor medical residency training (Section 5508(c), p. 1462)
  92. Graduate nurse education demonstration program (Section 5509, p. 1472)
  93. Grant program to establish demonstration projects for community-based mental health settings (Section 5604, p. 1486)
  94. Commission on Key National Indicators (Section 5605, p. 1489)
  95. Quality assurance and performance improvement program for skilled nursing facilities (Section 6102, p. 1554)
  96. Special focus facility program for skilled nursing facilities (Section 6103(a)(3), p. 1561)
  97. Special focus facility program for nursing facilities (Section 6103(b)(3), p. 1568)
  98. National independent monitor pilot program for skilled nursing facilities and nursing facilities (Section 6112, p. 1589)
  99. Demonstration projects for nursing facilities involved in the culture change movement (Section 6114, p. 1597)
  100. Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (Section 6301, p. 1619)
  101. Standing methodology committee for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (Section 6301, p. 1629)
  102. Board of Governors for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (Section 6301, p. 1638)
  103. Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund (Section 6301(e), p. 1656)
  104. Elder Justice Coordinating Council (Section 6703, p. 1773)
  105. Advisory Board on Elder Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation (Section 6703, p. 1776)
  106. Grant program to create elder abuse forensic centers (Section 6703, p. 1783)
  107. Grant program to promote continuing education for long-term care staffers (Section 6703, p. 1787)
  108. Grant program to improve management practices and training (Section 6703, p. 1788)
  109. Grant program to subsidize costs of electronic health records (Section 6703, p. 1791)
  110. Grant program to promote adult protective services (Section 6703, p. 1796)
  111. Grant program to conduct elder abuse detection and prevention (Section 6703, p. 1798)
  112. Grant program to support long-term care ombudsmen (Section 6703, p. 1800)
  113. National Training Institute for long-term care surveyors (Section 6703, p. 1806)
  114. Grant program to fund State surveys of long-term care residences (Section 6703, p. 1809)
  115. CLASS Independence Fund (Section 8002, p. 1926)
  116. CLASS Independence Fund Board of Trustees (Section 8002, p. 1927)
  117. CLASS Independence Advisory Council (Section 8002, p. 1931)
  118. Personal Care Attendants Workforce Advisory Panel (Section 8002(c), p. 1938)
  119. Multi-state health plans offered by Office of Personnel Management (Section 10104(p), p. 2086)
  120. Advisory board for multi-state health plans (Section 10104(p), p. 2094)
  121. Pregnancy Assistance Fund (Section 10212, p. 2164)
  122. Value-based purchasing program for ambulatory surgical centers (Section 10301, p. 2176)
  123. Demonstration project for payment adjustments to home health services (Section 10315, p. 2200)
  124. Pilot program for care of individuals in environmental emergency declaration areas (Section 10323, p. 2223)
  125. Grant program to screen at-risk individuals for environmental health conditions (Section 10323(b), p. 2231)
  126. Pilot programs to implement value-based purchasing (Section 10326, p. 2242)
  127. Grant program to support community-based collaborative care networks (Section 10333, p. 2265)
  128. Centers for Disease Control Office of Minority Health (Section 10334, p. 2272)
  129. Health Resources and Services Administration Office of Minority Health (Section 10334, p. 2272)
  130. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Office of Minority Health (Section 10334, p. 2272)
  131. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Office of Minority Health (Section 10334, p. 2272)
  132. Food and Drug Administration Office of Minority Health (Section 10334, p. 2272)
  133. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Office of Minority Health (Section 10334, p. 2272)
  134. Grant program to promote small business wellness programs (Section 10408, p. 2285)
  135. Cures Acceleration Network (Section 10409, p. 2289)
  136. Cures Acceleration Network Review Board (Section 10409, p. 2291)
  137. Grant program for Cures Acceleration Network (Section 10409, p. 2297)
  138. Grant program to promote centers of excellence for depression (Section 10410, p. 2304)
  139. Advisory committee for young women’s breast health awareness education campaign (Section 10413, p. 2322)
  140. Grant program to provide assistance to provide information to young women with breast cancer (Section 10413, p. 2326)
  141. Interagency Access to Health Care in Alaska Task Force (Section 10501, p. 2329)
  142. Grant program to train nurse practitioners as primary care providers (Section 10501(e), p. 2332)
  143. Grant program for community-based diabetes prevention (Section 10501(g), p. 2337)
  144. Grant program for providers who treat a high percentage of medically underserved populations (Section 10501(k), p. 2343)
  145. Grant program to recruit students to practice in underserved communities (Section 10501(l), p. 2344)
  146. Community Health Center Fund (Section 10503, p. 2355)
  147. Demonstration project to provide access to health care for the uninsured at reduced fees (Section 10504, p. 2357)
  148. Demonstration program to explore alternatives to tort litigation (Section 10607, p. 2369)
  149. Indian Health demonstration program for chronic shortages of health professionals (S. 1790, Section 112, p. 24)*
  150. Office of Indian Men’s Health (S. 1790, Section 136, p. 71)*
  151. Indian Country modular component facilities demonstration program (S. 1790, Section 146, p. 108)*
  152. Indian mobile health stations demonstration program (S. 1790, Section 147, p. 111)*
  153. Office of Direct Service Tribes (S. 1790, Section 172, p. 151)*
  154. Indian Health Service mental health technician training program (S. 1790, Section 181, p. 173)*
  155. Indian Health Service program for treatment of child sexual abuse victims (S. 1790, Section 181, p. 192)*
  156. Indian Health Service program for treatment of domestic violence and sexual abuse (S. 1790, Section 181, p. 194)*
  157. Indian youth telemental health demonstration project (S. 1790, Section 181, p. 204)*
  158. Indian youth life skills demonstration project (S. 1790, Section 181, p. 220)*
  159. Indian Health Service Director of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment (S. 1790, Section 199B, p. 258)*

 

*Section 10221, page 2173 of H.R. 3590 deems that S. 1790 shall be deemed as passed with certain amendments.

We Passed the Bill, But We STILL Don’t Know What’s In It…

The Mercatus Center is out today with several papers examining the quality of Obamacare regulations.  The papers take a specific look at eight Obamacare-related interim final rules – those rules that took effect WITHOUT prior public comment – published last year, and effectively undermine Speaker Pelosi’s famous quote that we had to pass the bill to find out what’s in it.  According to the studies, the regulatory analysis performed by the HHS bureaucrats to justify these Obamacare regulations is so poor, we passed the bill and we STILL don’t know what’s in it:

  • The health care [regulatory impact analyses] presented no monetary estimates of benefits, often overestimated the number of people who would benefit, and usually underestimated costs – often by hundreds of millions or billions of dollars.”
  • “The regulation establishing subsidies for early retiree health insurance failed to consider the possibility of “crowd out,” meaning a substantial portion of the subsidies would be given to employers who were going to continue health insurance for early retirees anyway.  This omission means the analysis substantially overstates the number of people who would retain coverage as a result of the regulation.”
  • “None of the regulations consider “moral hazard” – the risk that individuals will engage in wasteful health care spending or unhealthy activities because the insurance company is paying most of the cost.”
  • For at least three and possibly five of the eight rules, more accurate estimates of benefits and costs would likely have reversed the conclusion that benefits outweighed costs.”
  • In numerous cases, the agencies neglected to analyze alternatives that would have been obvious to researchers familiar with the health policy literature.  For the regulation extending health insurance coverage to adult dependent children up to age 26, the analysis did not even consider using the established Internal Revenue Service (IRS) definition of “dependent,” even though that arguably would have made compliance much simpler. Instead, the regulation involved a whole new definition.”
  • “The analysis of the regulation mandating coverage of preventive services did not consider alternative criteria for covered services, such as services that produce net cost savings or that produce results at some specified cost per outcome.  In addition, this analysis selectively cited literature that conveyed the impression that most preventive services pay for themselves by reducing the need for future health care expenditures, when in reality only a minority of such services do.”

Another Mercatus analysis found that Obamacare regulations scored significantly lower than other federal regulations with respect to their quality.  When judged on 12 criteria such as data documentation (How verifiable are the data used in the analysis?) and goal metrics (Does the rule establish measures to track its future performance?), the eight Obamacare regulations scored lower than other federal regulations issued in 2008 and 2009, including those issued by HHS.

As a reminder, through the end of 2011 the Administration had ALREADY issued more than 10,000 pages of Obamacare-related regulations and notices in the Federal Register.  By noting the weak analyses that regulators have used to justify these Obamacare regulations, the Mercatus studies have made the case not only that Obamacare’s impact on business could be more costly than advertised, but also that the supposed benefits of these regulations may end up being illusory – meaning at a time of economic weakness, businesses have been saddled with additional costs for no great purpose.

Health Provisions in This Afternoon’s Votes on Jobs Package

A quick reminder/update to staff about the health care provisions to be voted on as part of the vote series beginning circa 2 PM.  H.R. 674, the three-percent withholding bill, has as its primary pay-for provisions including Social Security benefits in the definition of income with respect to Obamacare’s new subsidy regime (a provision unchanged by the Reid amendment filed earlier this week).  The change would have the effect of reducing the number of early retirees eligible for Medicaid benefits, and lowering the amount of subsidies received by other early retirees, as their Social Security retirement benefits would now be counted as income when determining their eligibility for taxpayer-funded health benefits.  A CBO score of this provision, which was added to H.R. 674 in the House, can be found here, and an AP article explaining the issue can be found here.

In addition, the McCain amendment (i.e., the Republican jobs alternative) to H.R. 674 includes two health related provisions.  The first would repeal Obamacare, including the changes made to the health care law under reconciliation. (The bill would NOT repeal the student loan provisions included in last year’s reconciliation measure.)  Text is identical to H.R. 2, on which the Senate voted earlier this year.  The second provision is medical liability reform, including limits on punitive and non-economic damages, restrictions on attorney contingency fees, time limits on filing suits, and related provisions.  This legislative language echoes H.R. 5, the most recent CBO cost estimate of which can be found here.