White House Budget Summary: Obama’s “One Percent” Solution

According to the Congressional Budget Office’s most recent baselines, the federal government will spend a total of $6.87 trillion on Medicare and $4.36 trillion on Medicaid over the next ten years – that’s $11.2 trillion total, not even counting additional state spending on Medicaid.  Yet President Obama’s budget, released today, contains net deficit savings of only $152 billion from health care programs.  That’s a total savings of only 1.35 percent of the trillions the federal government will spend on health care in the coming decade.  Sadly, it’s another sign the President isn’t serious about real budget and deficit reform.

Overall, the budget:

  • Proposes a total of $401 billion in savings, yet calls for $249 billion in unpaid-for spending due to the Medicare physician reimbursement “doc fix” – thus resulting in only $152 billion in net deficit savings. (The $249 billion presumes a ten year freeze of Medicare physician payments; however, the budget does NOT propose ways to pay for this new spending.)
  • Proposes few structural reforms to Medicare; those that are included – weak as they are – are not scheduled to take effect until 2017, well after President Obama leaves office.  If the proposals are so sound, why the delay?
  • Requests a more than 50% increase – totaling $1.4 billion – for program management at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, of which the vast majority would be used to implement Obamacare.
  • Includes mandatory proposals in the budget that largely track last year’s budget and the President’s September 2011 deficit proposal to Congress, with a few exceptions.  The largest difference between this year’s budget and the prior submissions is a massive increase in savings from reductions to nursing and rehabilitation facilities – $79 billion, compared to a $32.5 billion estimated impact in September 2011.

A full summary follows below.  We will have further information on the budget in the coming days.

Discretionary Spending

When compared to Fiscal Year 2013 appropriated amounts, the budget calls for the following changes in discretionary spending by major HHS divisions (tabulated by budget authority):

  • $37 million (1.5%) increase for the Food and Drug Administration (not including $770 million in increased user fees);
  • $435 million (4.9%) increase for the Health Services and Resources Administration;
  • $97 million (2.2%) increase for the Indian Health Service;
  • $344 million (5.7%) increase for the Centers for Disease Control;
  • $274 million (0.9%) increase for the National Institutes of Health; and
  • $1.4 billion (52.9%) increase for the discretionary portion of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services program management account.

With regard to the above numbers for CDC and HRSA, note that these are discretionary numbers only.  The Administration’s budget also would allocate an additional $1 billion mandatory spending from the Prevention and Public Health “slush fund” created in Obamacare, further increasing spending levels.  For instance, CDC spending would be increased by an additional $755 million.

Obamacare Implementation Funding and Personnel:  As previously noted, the budget includes more than $1.4 billion in discretionary spending increases for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which the HHS Budget in Brief claims would be used to “continue implementing key provisions of [Obamacare].”  This funding would finance 712 new bureaucrats within CMS when compared to last fiscal year – a massive increase when compared to a request of 256 new FTEs in last year’s budget proposal.  Overall, the HHS budget proposes an increase of 1,311 full-time equivalent positions within the bureaucracy compared to projections for the current fiscal cycle, and an increase of 3,327 bureaucrats compared to last fiscal year.

The budget includes specific requests related to Obamacare totaling over $2 billion, including:

  • $803.5 million for “CMS activities to support [Exchanges] in FY 2014,” including funding for the federally-funded Exchange, for which the health law itself did not appropriate funding;
  • $837 million for “beneficiary education and outreach activities through the National Medicare Education program and consumer support…including $554 million for the [Exchanges];”
  • $519 million for “general IT systems and other support,” including funding for the federal Exchange;
  • $3.8 million for updates to healthcare.gov;
  • $18.4 million to oversee the medical loss ratio regulations; and
  • $24 million for administrative activities in Medicaid related to “implement[ing] new responsibilities” under Obamacare.

Exchange Funding:  The budget envisions HHS spending $1.5 billion on Exchange grants in 2013.  That’s an increase of over $300 million compared to last year’s estimate of fiscal year 2013 spending – despite the fact that most states have chosen not to create their own Exchanges.  The budget anticipates a further $2.1 billion in spending on Exchange grants in fiscal year 2014.  The health care law provides the Secretary with an unlimited amount of budget authority to fund state Exchange grants through 2015.  However, other reports have noted that the Secretary does NOT have authority to use these funds to construct a federal Exchange.

Abstinence Education Funding:  The budget proposes eliminating the abstinence education funding program, and converting those funds into a new pregnancy prevention program.

Medicare Proposals (Total savings of $359.9 Billion, including interactions)

Bad Debts:  Reduces bad debt payments to providers – for unpaid cost-sharing owed by beneficiaries – from 65 percent down to 25 percent over three years, beginning in 2014.  The Simpson-Bowles Commission made similar recommendations in its final report.  Saves $25.5 billion.

Medical Education Payments:  Reduces the Indirect Medical Education adjustment paid to teaching hospitals beginning in 2014, saving $11 billion.  Previous studies by the Medicare Payment Advisory Committee (MedPAC) have indicated that IME payments to teaching hospitals may be greater than the actual costs the hospitals incur.

Rural Payments:  Reduces critical access hospital payments from 101% of costs to 100% of costs, saving $1.4 billion, and prohibits hospitals fewer than 10 miles away from the nearest hospital from receiving a critical access hospital designation, saving $700 million.

Anti-Fraud Provisions:  Assumes $400 million in savings from various anti-fraud provisions, including limiting the discharge of debt in bankruptcy proceedings associated with fraudulent activities.

Imaging:  Reduces imaging payments by assuming a higher level of utilization for certain types of equipment, saving $400 million.  Imposes prior authorization requirements for advanced imaging; no savings are assumed, a change from the September 2011 deficit proposal, which said prior authorization would save $900 million.

Pharmaceutical Price Controls:  Expands Medicaid price controls to dual eligible and low-income subsidy beneficiaries participating in Part D, saving $123.2 billion according to OMB.  Some have expressed concerns that further expanding government-imposed price controls to prescription drugs could harm innovation and the release of new therapies that could help cure diseases.

Medicare Drug Discounts:  Proposes accelerating the “doughnut hole” drug discount plan included in PPACA, filling in the “doughnut hole” completely by 2015.  While the budget claims this proposal will save $11.2 billion over ten years, some may be concerned that – by raising drug spending, and eliminating incentives for seniors to choose generic pharmaceuticals over brand name drugs, this provision will actually INCREASE Medicare spending, consistent with prior CBO estimates at the time of PPACA’s passage.

Post-Acute Care:  Reduces various acute-care payment updates (details not specified) and equalizes payment rates between skilled nursing facilities and inpatient rehabilitation facilities, saving $79 billion – a significant increase compared to the $56.7 billion in last year’s budget and the $32.5 billion in proposed savings under the President’s September 2011 deficit proposal.  Equalizes payments between IRFs and SNFs for certain conditions, saving $2 billion.  Adjusts payments to inpatient rehabilitation facilities and skilled nursing facilities to account for unnecessary hospital readmissions and encourage appropriate care, saving a total of $4.7 billion.  Restructures post-acute care reimbursements through the use of bundled payments, saving $8.2 billion.

Physician Payment:  Includes language extending accountability standards to physicians who self-refer for radiation therapy, therapy services, and advanced imaging services, saving $6.1 billion.  Makes adjustments to clinical laboratory payments, designed to align Medicare with private payment rates, saving $9.5 billion.  Expands availability of Medicare data for performance and quality improvement; no savings assumed.

Medicare Drugs:  Reduces payment of physician administered drugs from 106 percent of average sales price to 103 percent of average sales price.  Some may note reports that similar payment reductions, implemented as part of the sequester, have caused some cancer clinics to limit their Medicare patient load.  By including a similar proposal in his budget, President Obama has effectively endorsed these policies.  Saves $4.5 billion.

Medicare Advantage:  Resurrects a prior-year proposal to increase Medicare Advantage coding intensity adjustments; this provision would have the effect of reducing MA plan payments, based on an assumption that MA enrollees are healthier on average than those in government-run Medicare.  Saves $15.3 billion over ten years.  Also proposes $4.1 billion in additional savings by aligning employer group waiver plan payments with average MA plan bids.

Additional Means Testing:  Increases means tested premiums under Parts B and D by five percentage points, beginning in 2017.  Freezes the income thresholds at which means testing applies until 25 percent of beneficiaries are subject to such premiums.  Saves $50 billion over ten years, and presumably more thereafter, as additional seniors would hit the means testing threshold, subjecting them to higher premiums.

Medicare Deductible Increase:  Increases Medicare Part B deductible by $25 in 2017, 2019, and 2021 – but for new beneficiaries only; “current beneficiaries or near retirees [not defined] would not be subject to the revised deductible.”  Saves $3.3 billion.

Home Health Co-Payment:  Beginning in 2017, introduces a home health co-payment of $100 per episode for new beneficiaries only, in cases where an episode lasts five or more visits and is NOT proceeded by a hospital stay.  MedPAC has previously recommended introducing home health co-payments as a way to ensure appropriate utilization.  Saves $730 million.

Medigap Surcharge:  Imposes a Part B premium surcharge equal to about 15 percent of the average Medigap premium – or about 30 percent of the Part B premium – for seniors with Medigap supplemental insurance that provides first dollar coverage.  Applies beginning in 2017 to new beneficiaries only.  A study commissioned by MedPAC previously concluded that first dollar Medigap coverage induces beneficiaries to consume more medical services, thus increasing costs for the Medicare program and federal taxpayers.  Saves $2.9 billion.

Generic Drug Incentives:  Proposes increasing co-payments for certain brand-name drugs for beneficiaries receiving the Part D low-income subsidy, while reducing co-payments for relevant generic drugs by 15 percent, in an attempt to increase generic usage among low-income seniors currently insulated from much of the financial impact of their purchasing decisions.  Saves $6.7 billion, according to OMB.

Lower Caps on Medicare Spending:  Section 3403 of the health care law established an Independent Payment Advisory Board tasked with limiting Medicare spending to the growth of the economy plus one percentage point (GDP+1) in 2018 and succeeding years.  The White House proposal would reduce this target to GDP+0.5 percent.  The Medicare actuary has previously written that the spending adjustments contemplated by IPAB and the health care law “are unlikely to be sustainable on a permanent annual basis” and “very challenging” – problems that would be exacerbated by utilizing a slower target rate for Medicare spending growth.  According to the budget, this proposal would save $4.1 billion, mainly in 2023.

Medicaid and Other Health Proposals (Total savings of $41.1 Billion)

Limit Durable Medical Equipment Reimbursement:  Caps Medicaid reimbursements for durable medical equipment (DME) at Medicare rates, beginning in 2014.  The health care law extended and expanded a previous Medicare competitive bidding demonstration project included in the Medicare Modernization Act, resulting in savings to the Medicare program.  This proposal, by capping Medicaid reimbursements for DME at Medicare levels, would attempt to extend those savings to the Medicaid program.  Saves $4.5 billion over ten years.

Rebase Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital Payments:  Proposes beginning DSH payment reductions in 2015 instead of 2014, and “to determine future state DSH allotments based on states’ actual DSH allotments as reduced” by PPACA.  Saves $3.6 billion, all in fiscal 2023.

Medicaid Anti-Fraud Savings:  Assumes $3.7 billion in savings from a variety of Medicaid anti-fraud provisions.  Included in this amount are proposals that would remove exceptions to the requirement that Medicaid must reject payments when another party is liable for a medical claim.  A separate proposal related to the tracking of pharmaceutical price controls would save $8.8 billion.

Transitional Medical Assistance/QI Program:  Provides for temporary extensions of the Transitional Medical Assistance program, which provides Medicaid benefits for low-income families transitioning from welfare to work, along with the Qualifying Individual program, which provides assistance to low-income seniors in paying Medicare premiums.  The extensions cost $1.1 billion and $590 million, respectively.

“Pay-for-Delay:”  Prohibits brand-name pharmaceutical manufacturers from entering into arrangements that would delay the availability of new generic drugs. Some Members have previously expressed concerns that these provisions would harm innovation, and actually impede the incentives to generic manufacturers to bring cost-saving generic drugs on the market.  OMB scores this proposal as saving $11 billion.

Follow-on Biologics:  Reduces to seven years the period of exclusivity for follow-on biologics.  Current law provides for a twelve-year period of exclusivity, based upon an amendment to the health care law that was adopted on a bipartisan basis in both the House and Senate (one of the few substantive bipartisan amendments adopted).  Some Members have expressed concern that reducing the period of exclusivity would harm innovation and discourage companies from developing life-saving treatments.  OMB scores this proposal as saving $3.3 billion.

State Waivers:  Accelerates from 2017 to 2014 the date under which states can submit request for waivers of SOME of the health care law’s requirements to HHS.  While supposedly designed to increase flexibility, even liberal commentators have agreed that under the law’s state waiver programcritics of Obama’s proposal have a point: It wouldn’t allow to enact the sorts of health care reforms they would prefer” and thatconservatives can’t do any better – at least not under these rules.”  No cost is assumed; however, in its re-estimate of the President’s budget last year, CBO scored this proposal as costing $4.5 billion.

Implementation “Slush Fund:”  Proposes $400 million in new spending for HHS to implement the proposals listed above.

FEHB Contracting:  Similar to last year’s budget, proposes streamlining pharmacy benefit contracting within the Federal Employee Health Benefits program, by centralizing pharmaceutical benefit contracting within the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), saving $1.6 billion.  However, this year’s budget goes further in restructuring FEHBP – OPM would also be empowered to modernize benefit designs (savings of $264 million); create a “self-plus-one” benefit option for federal employees and extend benefits to domestic partners (total savings of $5.2 billion, despite the costs inherent in the latter option); and adjust premium levels based on tobacco usage and/or participation in wellness programs (savings of $1.3 billion).  Some individuals, noting that OPM is also empowered to create “multi-state plans” as part of the health care overhaul, may be concerned that these provisions could be part of a larger plan to make OPM the head of a de facto government-run health plan.

Other Health Care Proposal of Note

Tax Credit:  The Treasury Green Book proposes expanding the small business health insurance tax credit included in the health care law.   Specifically, the budget would expand the number of employers eligible for the credit to include all employers with up to 50 full-time workers; firms with under 20 workers would be eligible for the full credit.  (Currently those levels are 25 and 10 full-time employees, respectively.)  The budget also changes the coordination of the two phase-outs based on a firm’s average wage and number of employees, with the changes designed to make more companies eligible for a larger credit.  The changes would begin in the current calendar and tax year (i.e., 2013).  According to OMB, these changes would cost $10.4 billion over ten years – down from last year’s estimate of $14 billion over ten years.  Many may view this proposal as a tacit admission that the credit included in the law was a failure, because its limited reach and complicated nature – firms must fill out seven worksheets to determine their eligibility – have deterred American job creators from receiving this subsidy.  Moreover, the reduced score in this year’s budget compared to last year’s implies that even this expansion of the credit will have a less robust impact than originally anticipated.

Donald Berwick Rations the Facts With His Eyes Open

Former Medicare chief Dr. Donald Berwick published an op-ed in today’s Boston Globe in which he endorses Professor Elizabeth Warren for her support of Obamacare.  Unfortunately, however, the column reveals that Dr. Berwick must not have learned much about the Medicare program during his time at CMS, given many of his statements:

“Obamacare reduce costs…”  That’s not what Medicare’s own actuary said.  Earlier this year, the actuary published an analysis indicating the law would raise costs by more than $478 billion.  Last year, the actuary testified before Congress, calling “False” the Administration’s stated goal of reducing health care costs.

“It targets waste, fraud, and abuse, reduces unnecessary subsidies to insurance companies…”  Again, that’s not what Medicare’s own actuary said.  He has concluded that over the long-term, up to 40 percent of providers would become unprofitable due to Obamacare, and could “have to withdraw from providing services to Medicare beneficiaries.”  Just this week, an Alabama hospital took a different course – it decided to shut down entirely, due to the impact of Obamacare on its business model.

“President Obama’s health reforms do not cut any guaranteed Medicare benefits…”  This statement is manifestly FALSE, as we have previously demonstrated.  Obamacare cut benefits for wealthy seniors, by forcing them to pay more for their Medicare coverage.  And President Obama’s budget proposed even further benefit cuts – new means-testing, additional co-payments, and higher premiums.  In many cases, these changes are actually good policy, but they’re still cuts to “guaranteed benefits” – and no one should be dishonest enough to claim that they aren’t.

“Thanks to Obamacare, seniors can now get a free annual wellness visit…”  Also incorrect.  These services may be delivered without any out-of-pocket cost-sharing, but they are NOT “free” – someone ends up paying for them.  In fact, all seniors end up paying, as do all Americans – through higher taxpayer spending on Medicare, and higher Part B premiums for seniors.

“Medicare and Medicaid both face challenges today, but not because of Obamacare.  The challenges exist throughout the health care system, mainly in the form of rising costs.”  The implication is that Medicare isn’t the problem – that health costs as a whole are a problem.  But the fact is that Medicare – and particularly its focus on fee-for-service medicine – has been one of the driving elements of rising costs and inefficiency in our health care system.  The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, in a January report analyzing dozens of Medicare demonstration programs, said these programs did not contain health costs, precisely because of the flawed incentives included in fee-for-service medicine: “Demonstrations aimed at reducing spending and increasing quality of care face significant challenges in overcoming the incentives inherent in Medicare’s fee-for-service payment system, which rewards providers for delivering more care.”  In other words, Medicare isn’t the solution to health care costs – it’s the problem.

Dr. Berwick’s tenure at CMS was cut short due to his many controversial remarks, most notably his (in)famous interview in which he claimed that “The decision is not whether or not we will ration care – the decision is whether we will ration with our eyes open.”  Given his economies with accuracy in the op-ed, many may wonder if Dr. Berwick has also decided to ration the true facts about Obamacare with his eyes open.

Flawed Medicaid Study Leads to Flawed Conclusions

On Wednesday, Bloomberg published an article regarding a new Bloomberg Government study surrounding state spending on Medicaid.  The study (subscription required) alleges that Medicaid costs are growing less than state budgets as a whole.  However, the study’s headline conclusion only examines state general fund spending on Medicaid, not overall state spending on Medicaid.  And the report admits that, if ALL state spending is taken into account, Medicaid spending grew significantly during the past decade:

The increase in state Medicaid spending over the past decade was greater if one includes what the state budget officers’ association calls “other state funding,” which it defines as “other funds and revenue sources used as Medicaid match, such as local funds and provider taxes, fees, donations, assessments”….If one includes spending on Medicaid from other state funds, Medicaid costs grew by 54 percent from 2002 through 2011, one-third more than total statewide expenditures excluding bonds.

In other words, the study’s major conclusion is incorrect; when examining ALL state spending, Medicaid expenditures have increased faster than those on education, corrections, transportation, etc.

The Bloomberg study attempts to justify its focus on general fund spending by stating that other forms of state spending are merely gimmicks designed by states to get additional federal matching funds.  It is true that both conservatives and liberals have opposed various provider taxes – where states raise taxes on hospitals and other providers, draw additional federal matching funds, and pass those matched funds right back to providers – as an abusive gimmick.  That is why the Bush Administration in 2007-08 proposed several major regulations attempting to crack down on these abuses – regulations which Democrats in Congress blocked through legislative action.

But what the Bloomberg study misses is the fact that new maintenance of effort mandates imposed by the Obama Administration have forced states to resort to provider taxes and other similar “gimmicks” as a way to mitigate the effects of Washington’s additional mandates.  Thanks to the mandates in Obamacare, states cannot raise co-payments, trim beneficiary rolls, or even engage in anti-fraud activities as a way to control rising Medicaid expenditures.  Because Obamacare has taken away states’ freedom to manage their own Medicaid programs in a way that could help contain costs, many states have resorted to provider taxes and other budgetary gimmicks to offset this Washington-mandated spending.  According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, 16 additional states have imposed new provider taxes on hospitals between 2009-2012 – actions which reflect states attempting to use any means necessary to alleviate the harmful effects of Obamacare’s at least $118 billion in unfunded mandates.

Some would argue the solution to this problem would involve Congress eliminating BOTH the Medicaid “tax gimmicks” AND the Medicaid mandates in Obamacare that have forced many states to resort to such gimmicks – not to assume that one washes out the other and there is no problem that needs addressing.  Therein lies the Bloomberg study’s critical flaw, in presuming that two Medicaid wrongs – new federal mandates, and the tax gimmicks states have used to mitigate the harmful effects of those mandates – somehow combine to create a policy right.

White House Budget Summary

Overall, the budget:

  • Proposes $362 billion in savings, yet calls for $429 billion in unpaid-for spending due to the Medicare physician reimbursement “doc fix” – thus resulting in a net increase in the deficit. (The $429 billion presumes a ten year freeze of Medicare physician payments; however, the budget does NOT propose ways to pay for this new spending.)
  • Proposes few structural reforms to Medicare; those that are included – weak as they are – are not scheduled to take effect until 2017, well after President Obama leaves office.  If the proposals are so sound, why the delay?
  • Requests just over $1 billion for program management at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, of which the vast majority – $864 million – would be used to implement the health care law.
  • Requests more than half a billion dollars for comparative effectiveness research, which many may be concerned could result in government bureaucrats imposing cost-based limits on treatments.
  • Includes mandatory proposals in the budget that largely track the September deficit proposal to Congress, with a few exceptions.  The budget does NOT include proposals to reduce Medicare frontier state payments, even though this policy was included in the September proposal.  The budget also does not include recovery provisions regarding Medicare Advantage payments to insurers; however, the Administration has indicated they intend to implement this provision administratively.
  • Does not include a proposal relating to Medicaid eligibility levels included in the September submission, as that proposal was enacted into law in November (P.L. 112-56).

 

Discretionary Spending

When compared to Fiscal Year 2012 appropriated amounts, the budget calls for the following changes in discretionary spending by major HHS divisions (tabulated by budget authority):

  • $12 million (0.5%) increase for the Food and Drug Administration – along with a separate proposed $643 million increase in FDA user fees;
  • $138 million (2.2%) decrease for the Health Services and Resources Administration;
  • $116 million (2.7%) increase for the Indian Health Service;
  • $664 million (11.5%) decrease for the Centers for Disease Control;
  • No net change in funding for the National Institutes of Health;
  • $1 billion (26.2%) increase for the discretionary portion of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services program management account; and
  • $29 million (5.0%) increase for the discretionary Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control fund.

With regard to the above numbers for CDC and HRSA, note that these are discretionary numbers only.  The Administration’s budget also would allocate additional $1.25 billion in mandatory spending from the new Prevention and Public Health “slush fund” created in the health care law, likely eliminating any real budgetary savings (despite the appearance of same above).

Other Health Care Points of Note

Tax Credit:  The Treasury Green Book proposes expanding the small business health insurance tax credit included in the health care law.   Specifically, the budget would expand the number of employers eligible for the credit to include all employers with up to 50 full-time workers; firms with under 20 workers would be eligible for the full credit.  (Currently those levels are 25 and 10 full-time employees, respectively.)  The budget also changes the coordination of the two phase-outs based on a firm’s average wage and number of employees, with the changes designed to make more companies eligible for a larger credit.  According to OMB, these changes would cost $14 billion over ten years.  Many may view this proposal as a tacit admission that the credit included in the law was a failure, because its limited reach and complicated nature – firms must fill out seven worksheets to determine their eligibility – have deterred American job creators from receiving this subsidy.

Comparative Effectiveness Research:  The budget proposes a total of $599 million in funding for comparative effectiveness research.  Only $78 million of this money comes from existing funds included in the health care law – meaning the Administration has proposed discretionary spending of more than $500 million on comparative effectiveness research.  Some have previously expressed concerns that this research could be used to restrict access to treatments perceived as too costly by federal bureaucrats.  It is also worth noting that this new $520 million in research funding would NOT be subject to the anti-rationing provisions included in the health care law.  Section 218 of this year’s omnibus appropriations measure included a prohibition on HHS using funds to engage in cost-effectiveness research, a provision which this budget request would presumably seek to overturn.

Obamacare Implementation Funding and Personnel:  As previously noted, the budget includes more than $1 billion in discretionary spending increases for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which the HHS Budget in Brief claims would be used to “continue implementing [Obamacare], including Exchanges.”  This funding would finance 256 new bureaucrats within CMS, many of whom would likely be used to implement the law.  Overall, the HHS budget proposes an increase of 1,393 full-time equivalent positions within the bureaucracy.

Specific details of the $1 billion in implementation funding include:

  • $290 million for “consumer support in the private marketplace;”
  • $549 million for “general IT systems and other support,” including funding for the federally-funded Exchange, for which the health law itself did not appropriate funding;
  • $18 million for updates to healthcare.gov;
  • $15 million to oversee the medical loss ratio regulations; and
  • $30 million for consumer assistance grants.

Exchange Funding:  The budget envisions HHS spending $1.1 billion on Exchange grants in 2013, a $180 million increase over the current fiscal year.  The health care law provides the Secretary with an unlimited amount of budget authority to fund state Exchange grants through 2015.  However, other reports have noted that the Secretary does NOT have authority to use these funds to construct a federal Exchange, in the event some states choose not to implement their own state-based Exchanges.

Abstinence Education Funding:  The budget proposes eliminating the abstinence education funding program, and converting those funds into a new pregnancy prevention program.

Medicare Proposals (Total savings of $292.2 Billion)

Bad Debts:  Reduces bad debt payments to providers – for unpaid cost-sharing owed by beneficiaries – from 70 percent down to 25 percent over three years, beginning in 2013.  The Fiscal Commission had made similar recommendations in its final report.  Saves $35.9 billion.

Medical Education Payments:  Reduces the Indirect Medical Education adjustment paid to teaching hospitals by 10 percent beginning in 2014, saving $9.7 billion.  Previous studies by the Medicare Payment Advisory Committee (MedPAC) have indicated that IME payments to teaching hospitals may be greater than the actual costs the hospitals incur.

Rural Payments:  Reduces critical access hospital payments from 101% of costs to 100% of costs, saving $1.4 billion, and prohibits hospitals fewer than 10 miles away from the nearest hospital from receiving a critical access hospital designation, saving $590 million.  The budget does NOT include a proposal to end add-on payments for providers in frontier states, which was included in the President’s September deficit proposal.

Post-Acute Care:  Reduces various acute-care payment updates (details not specified) during the years 2013 through 2022, saving $56.7 billion – a significant increase compared to the $32.5 billion in savings under the President’s September deficit proposal.  Equalizes payment rates between skilled nursing facilities and inpatient rehabilitation facilities, saving $2 billion.  Increases the minimum percentage of inpatient rehabilitation facility patients that require intensive rehabilitation from 60 percent to 75 percent, saving $2.3 billion.  Reduces skilled nursing facility payments by up to 3%, beginning in 2015, for preventable readmissions, saving $2 billion.

Pharmaceutical Price Controls:  Expands Medicaid price controls to dual eligible and low-income subsidy beneficiaries participating in Part D, saving $155.6 billion according to OMB.  Some have expressed concerns that further expanding government-imposed price controls to prescription drugs could harm innovation and the release of new therapies that could help cure diseases.

Anti-Fraud Provisions:  Assumes $450 million in savings from various anti-fraud provisions, including limiting the discharge of debt in bankruptcy proceedings associated with fraudulent activities.

EHR Penalties:  Re-directs Medicare reimbursement penalties against physicians who do not engage in electronic prescribing beginning in 2020 back into the Medicare program.  The “stimulus” legislation that enacted the health IT provisions had originally required that penalties to providers be placed into the Medicare Improvement Fund; the budget would instead re-direct those revenues into the general fund, to finance the “doc fix” and related provisions.  OMB now scores this proposal as saving $590 million; when included in last year’s budget back in February, these changes were scored as saving $3.2 billion.

Imaging:  Reduces imaging payments by assuming a higher level of utilization for certain types of equipment, saving $400 million.  Also imposes prior authorization requirements for advanced imaging; no savings are assumed, a change from the September deficit proposal, which said prior authorization would save $900 million.

Additional Means Testing:  Increases means tested premiums under Parts B and D by 15%, beginning in 2017.  Freezes the income thresholds at which means testing applies until 25 percent of beneficiaries are subject to such premiums.  Saves $27.6 billion over ten years, and presumably more thereafter, as additional seniors would hit the means testing threshold, subject them to higher premiums.

Medicare Deductible Increase:  Increases Medicare Part B deductible by $25 in 2017, 2019, and 2021 – but for new beneficiaries only; “current beneficiaries or near retirees [not defined] would not be subject to the revised deductible.”  Saves $2 billion.

Home Health Co-Payment:  Beginning in 2017, introduces a home health co-payment of $100 per episode for new beneficiaries only, in cases where an episode lasts five or more visits and is NOT proceeded by a hospital stay.  MedPAC has previously recommended introducing home health co-payments as a way to ensure appropriate utilization.  Saves $350 million.

Medigap Surcharge:  Imposes a Part B premium surcharge equal to about 15 percent of the average Medigap premium – or about 30 percent of the Part B premium – for seniors with Medigap supplemental insurance that provides first dollar coverage.  Applies beginning in 2017 to new beneficiaries only.  A study commissioned by MedPAC previously concluded that first dollar Medigap coverage induces beneficiaries to consume more medical services, thus increasing costs for the Medicare program and federal taxpayers.  Saves $2.5 billion.

Lower Caps on Medicare Spending:  Section 3403 of the health care law established an Independent Payment Advisory Board tasked with limiting Medicare spending to the growth of the economy plus one percentage point (GDP+1) in 2018 and succeeding years.  The White House proposal would reduce this target to GDP+0.5 percent.  This approach has two potential problems:

  • First, under the Congressional Budget Office’s most recent baseline, IPAB recommendations would not be triggered at all – so it’s unclear whether the new, lower target level would actually generate measurable budgetary savings.  (In August 2010, CBO concluded an IPAB with an overall cap of GDP+1 would yield $13.8 billion in savings through 2020 – not enough to make a measurable impact on a program spending $500 billion per year.)
  • Second, the Medicare actuary has previously written that the spending adjustments contemplated by IPAB and the health care law “are unlikely to be sustainable on a permanent annual basis” and “very challenging” – problems that would be exacerbated by utilizing a slower target rate for Medicare spending growth.

According to the budget, this proposal would NOT achieve additional deficit savings.

Medicaid and Other Health Proposals (Total savings of $70.4 Billion)

Medicaid Provider Taxes:  Reduces limits on Medicaid provider tax thresholds, beginning in 2015; the tax threshold would be reduced over a three year period, to 3.5 percent in 2017 and future years.  State provider taxes are a financing method whereby states impose taxes on medical providers, and use these provider tax revenues to obtain additional federal Medicaid matching funds, thereby increasing the federal share of Medicaid expenses paid while decreasing the state share of expenses.  The Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006, enacted by a Republican Congress, capped the level of Medicaid provider taxes, and the Bush Administration proposed additional rules to reform Medicaid funding rules – rules that were blocked by the Democrat-run 110th Congress.  However, there is bipartisan support for addressing ways in which states attempt to “game” the Medicaid system, through provider taxes and other related methods, to obtain unwarranted federal matching funds – the liberal Center for Budget and Policy Priorities previously wrote about a series of “Rube Goldberg-like accounting arrangements” that “do not improve the quality of health care provided” and “frequently operate in a manner that siphons extra federal money to state coffers without affecting the provision of health care.”  This issue was also addressed in the fiscal commission’s report, although the commission exceeded the budget proposals by suggesting that Congress enact legislation “restricting and eventually eliminating” provider taxes, saving $44 billion.  OMB scores this proposal as saving $21.8 billion.

Blended Rate:  Proposes “replac[ing]…complicated federal matching formulas” in Medicaid “with a single matching rate specific to each state that automatically increases if a recession forces enrollment and state costs to rise.”  Details are unclear, but the Administration claims $17.9 billion in savings from this proposal – much less than the $100 billion figure bandied about in previous reports last summer.  It is also worth noting that the proposal could actually INCREASE the deficit, if a prolonged recession triggers the automatic increases in the federal Medicaid match referenced in the proposal.  On a related note, the budget once again ignores the governors’ multiple requests for flexibility from the mandates included in the health care law – unfunded mandates on states totaling at least $118 billion.

Transitional Medical Assistance/QI Program:  Provides for temporary extensions of the Transitional Medical Assistance program, which provides Medicaid benefits for low-income families transitioning from welfare to work, along with the Qualifying Individual program, which provides assistance to low-income seniors in paying Medicare premiums.  The extensions cost $815 million and $1.7 billion, respectively.

Limit Durable Medical Equipment Reimbursement:  Caps Medicaid reimbursements for durable medical equipment (DME) at Medicare rates, beginning in 2013.  The health care law extended and expanded a previous Medicare competitive bidding demonstration project included in the Medicare Modernization Act, resulting in savings to the Medicare program.  This proposal, by capping Medicaid reimbursements for DME at Medicare levels, would attempt to extend those savings to the Medicaid program.  OMB now scores this proposal as saving $3 billion; when included in the President’s budget last year, these changes were scored as saving $6.4 billion.

Rebase Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital Payments:  In 2021 and 2022, reallocates Medicaid DSH payments to hospitals treating low-income patients, based on states’ actual 2020 allotments (as amended and reduced by the health care law).  Saves $8.3 billion.

Medicaid Anti-Fraud Savings:  Assumes $3.2 billion in savings from a variety of Medicaid anti-fraud provisions, largely through tracking and enforcement of various provisions related to pharmaceuticals.  Included in this amount are proposals that would remove exceptions to the requirement that Medicaid must reject payments when another party is liable for a medical claim.

Flexibility on Benchmark Plans:  Proposes some new flexibility for states to require Medicaid “benchmark” plan coverage for non-elderly, non-disabled adults – but ONLY those with incomes above 133 percent of the federal poverty level (i.e., NOT the new Medicaid population obtaining coverage under the health care law).  No savings assumed.

“Pay-for-Delay:”  Prohibits brand-name pharmaceutical manufacturers from entering into arrangements that would delay the availability of new generic drugs.  Some Members have previously expressed concerns that these provisions would harm innovation, and actually impede the incentives to generic manufacturers to bring cost-saving generic drugs on the market.  OMB scores this proposal as saving $11 billion.

Follow-on Biologics:  Reduces to seven years the period of exclusivity for follow-on biologics.  Current law provides for a twelve-year period of exclusivity, based upon an amendment to the health care law that was adopted on a bipartisan basis in both the House and Senate (one of the few substantive bipartisan amendments adopted).  Some Members have expressed concern that reducing the period of exclusivity would harm innovation and discourage companies from developing life-saving treatments.  OMB scores this proposal as saving $3.8 billion.

FEHB Contracting:  Proposes streamlining pharmacy benefit contracting within the Federal Employee Health Benefits program, by centralizing pharmaceutical benefit contracting within the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).  Some individuals, noting that OPM is also empowered to create “multi-state plans” as part of the health care overhaul, may be concerned that these provisions could be part of a larger plan to make OPM the head of a de facto government-run health plan.  OMB scores this proposal as saving $1.7 billion.

Prevention “Slush Fund:”  Reduces spending by $4 billion on the Prevention and Public Health Fund created in the health care law.  Some Members have previously expressed concern that this fund would be used to fund projects like jungle gyms and bike paths, questionable priorities for the use of federal taxpayer dollars in a time of trillion-dollar deficits.

State Waivers:  Accelerates from 2017 to 2014 the date under which states can submit request for waivers of SOME of the health care law’s requirements to HHS.  While supposedly designed to increase flexibility, even liberal commentators have agreed that under the law’s state waiver programcritics of Obama’s proposal have a point: It wouldn’t allow to enact the sorts of health care reforms they would prefer” and thatconservatives can’t do any better – at least not under these rules.”  The proposal states that “the Administration is committed to the budget neutrality of these waivers;” however, the plan allocates $4 billion in new spending “to account for the possibility that CBO will estimate costs for this proposal.”

Implementation “Slush Fund:”  Proposes $400 million in new spending for HHS to implement the proposals listed above.

The President’s Shrinking Entitlement Savings

The President’s deficit proposal released this morning claims to achieve $320 billion in deficit savings.  As we’ve previously noted, given the size of our entitlement programs, that’s a comparatively insignificant amount – barely enough to finance a long-term “doc fix,” let alone make Medicare and Medicaid solvent for the long term.  But what’s interesting is how the size of the health care savings put forward by the President has actually SHRUNK over time.  The White House’s April “deficit framework” (i.e., a speech) claimed to achieve $340 billion in savings – $20 billion MORE than this morning’s proposal.

So what exactly prompted the President to LOWER his sights for entitlement savings over the last five months?  Was it the unprecedented downgrade of America’s debt rating?  The stock market swoon that quickly followed?  The chaos in Europe as that continent struggles to achieve fiscal discipline and avert a sovereign default crisis?  Or was it the event that happens on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November every fourth year?  You be the judge…

All that said, a detailed summary of the President’s (new) proposal follows below.  Keep in mind that Administration/OMB estimates may vary significantly from CBO scores, so remember that your budgetary mileage may vary.  (All scores are over a ten-year period unless otherwise indicated.)

 

Medicare Proposals (Total savings of $248 Billion)

Bad Debts:  Reduces bad debt payments to providers – for unpaid cost-sharing owed by beneficiaries – from 70 percent down to 25 percent over three years, beginning in 2013.  The Fiscal Commission had made similar recommendations in its final report.  Saves $20.2 billion.

Medical Education Payments:  Reduces the Indirect Medical Education adjustment paid to teaching hospitals by 10 percent beginning in 2013, saving $9.1 billion.  Previous studies by the Medicare Payment Advisory Committee (MedPAC) have indicated that IME payments to teaching hospitals may be greater than the actual costs the hospitals incur.

Rural Payments:  Ends add-on payments for providers in frontier states, saving $2.1 billion.  Reduces critical access hospital payments from 101% of costs to 100% of costs, saving $1 billion, and prohibits hospitals fewer than 10 miles away from the nearest hospital from receiving a critical access hospital designation, saving $3 billion.

Post-Acute Care:  Reduces various acute-care payment updates (details not specified) during the years 2014 through 2021, saving $32.5 billion.  Equalizes payment rates between skilled nursing facilities and inpatient rehabilitation facilities, saving $4.5 billion.  Increases the minimum percentage of inpatient rehabilitation facility patients that require intensive rehabilitation from 60 percent to 75 percent, saving $2.6 billion.  Reduces skilled nursing facility payments by up to 3%, beginning in 2015, for preventable readmissions, saving $2 billion.

Pharmaceutical Price Controls:  Expands Medicaid price controls to dual eligible and low-income subsidy beneficiaries participating in Part D, saving $135 billion according to OMB.  However, according to the Congressional Budget Office’s March 2011 Budget Options (Option 25), this proposal would generate smaller savings ($112 billion).  Some have expressed concerns that further expanding government-imposed price controls to prescription drugs could harm innovation and the release of new therapies that could help cure diseases.

MA Repayment Provisions:  Recovers payments to insurers participating in the Medicare Advantage (MA) program.  MA plans are currently paid on a prospective basis, with those payments adjusted according to the severity of beneficiaries’ ill health.  Some sample audits have discovered instances where plans could not retrospectively produce the necessary documentation to warrant the prospective coding adjustment that some beneficiaries received.  The deficit plan would apply this adjustment, currently contemplated for some beneficiaries based on the sample audit, to ALL beneficiaries.  OMB now scores this proposal as saving $2.3 billion; when included in the President’s budget back in February, these changes were scored as saving $6.2 billion.

Anti-Fraud Provisions:  Assumes $600 million in savings from various anti-fraud provisions, including limiting the discharge of debt in bankruptcy proceedings associated with fraudulent activities.

EHR Penalties:  Re-directs Medicare reimbursement penalties against physicians who do not engage in electronic prescribing beginning in 2020 back into the Medicare program.  The “stimulus” legislation that enacted the health IT provisions had originally required that penalties to providers be placed into the Medicare Improvement Fund; the budget would instead re-direct those revenues into the general fund, to finance the “doc fix” and related provisions.  OMB now scores this proposal as saving $500 million; when included in the President’s budget back in February, these changes were scored as saving $3.2 billion.

Imaging:  Reduces imaging payments by assuming a higher level of utilization for certain types of equipment, saving $400 million.  Also imposes prior authorization requirements for advanced imaging, saving $900 million.

Additional Means Testing:  Increases means tested premiums under Parts B and D by 15%, beginning in 2017.  Freezes the income thresholds at which means testing applies until 25 percent of beneficiaries are subject to such premiums.  Saves $20 billion over ten years, and presumably more thereafter, as additional seniors would hit the means testing threshold, subject them to higher premiums.

Medicare Deductible Increase:  Increases Medicare Part B deductible by $25 in 2017, 2019, and 2021 – but for new beneficiaries only; “current beneficiaries or near retirees [not defined] would not be subject to the revised deductible.”  Saves $1 billion.

Home Health Co-Payment:  Introduces a home health co-payment of $100 per episode for new beneficiaries only, in cases where an episode lasts five or more visits and is NOT proceeded by a hospital stay.  MedPAC has previously recommended introducing home health co-payments as a way to ensure appropriate utilization.  Saves $400 million.

Medigap Surcharge:  Imposes a Part B premium surcharge equal to about 15 percent of the average Medigap premium – or about 30 percent of the Part B premium – for seniors with Medigap supplemental insurance that provides first dollar coverage.  Applies beginning in 2017 to new beneficiaries only.  A study commissioned by MedPAC previously concluded that first dollar Medigap coverage induces beneficiaries to consume more medical services, thus increasing costs for the Medicare program and federal taxpayers.  Saves $2.5 billion.

Lower Caps on Medicare Spending:  Section 3403 of the health care law established an Independent Payment Advisory Board tasked with limiting Medicare spending to the growth of the economy plus one percentage point (GDP+1) in 2018 and succeeding years.  The White House proposal would reduce this target to GDP+0.5 percent.  This approach has two potential problems:

  • First, under the Congressional Budget Office’s most recent baseline, IPAB recommendations would not be triggered at all – so it’s unclear whether the new, lower target level would actually generate measurable budgetary savings.  (In August 2010, CBO concluded an IPAB with an overall cap of GDP+1 would yield $13.8 billion in savings through 2020 – not enough to make a measurable impact on a program spending $500 billion per year.)
  • Second, the Medicare actuary has previously written that the spending adjustments contemplated by IPAB and the health care law “are unlikely to be sustainable on a permanent annual basis” and “very challenging” – problems that would be exacerbated by utilizing a slower target rate for Medicare spending growth.

According to the Administration document, this proposal would NOT achieve additional deficit savings.

Medicaid and Other Health Proposals (Total savings of $72 Billion)

Medicaid Provider Taxes:  Reduces limits on Medicaid provider tax thresholds, beginning in 2015; the tax threshold would be reduced over a three year period, to 3.5 percent in 2017 and future years.  State provider taxes are a financing method whereby states impose taxes on medical providers, and use these provider tax revenues to obtain additional federal Medicaid matching funds, thereby increasing the federal share of Medicaid expenses paid while decreasing the state share of expenses.  The Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006, enacted by a Republican Congress, capped the level of Medicaid provider taxes, and the Bush Administration proposed additional rules to reform Medicaid funding rules – rules that were blocked by the Democrat-run 110th Congress.  However, there is bipartisan support for addressing ways in which states attempt to “game” the Medicaid system, through provider taxes and other related methods, to obtain unwarranted federal matching funds – the liberal Center for Budget and Policy Priorities previously wrote about a series of “Rube Goldberg-like accounting arrangements” that “do not improve the quality of health care provided” and “frequently operate in a manner that siphons extra federal money to state coffers without affecting the provision of health care.”  This issue was also addressed in the fiscal commission’s report, although the commission exceeded the budget proposals by suggesting that Congress enact legislation “restricting and eventually eliminating” provider taxes, saving $44 billion.  OMB now scores this proposal as saving $26.3 billion; when included in the President’s budget back in February, these changes were scored as saving $18.4 billion.

Blended Rate:  Proposes “replac[ing]…complicated federal matching formulas” in Medicaid “with a single matching rate specific to each state that automatically increases if a recession forces enrollment and state costs to rise.”  Details are unclear, but the Administration claims $14.9 billion in savings from this proposal – much less than the $100 billion figure bandied about in previous reports this summer.  It is also worth noting that the proposal could actually INCREASE the deficit, if a prolonged recession triggers the automatic increases in the federal Medicaid match referenced in the proposal.  On a related note, the deficit plan once again ignored the governors’ multiple requests for flexibility from the mandates included in the health care law – unfunded mandates on states totaling at least $118 billion.

Limit Durable Medical Equipment Reimbursement:  Caps Medicaid reimbursements for durable medical equipment (DME) at Medicare rates, beginning in 2013.  The health care law extended and expanded a previous Medicare competitive bidding demonstration project included in the Medicare Modernization Act, resulting in savings to the Medicare program.  This proposal, by capping Medicaid reimbursements for DME at Medicare levels, would attempt to extend those savings to the Medicaid program.  OMB now scores this proposal as saving $4.2 billion; when included in the President’s budget back in February, these changes were scored as saving $6.4 billion.

Third Party Liability:  Removes exceptions to the requirement that Medicaid must reject payments when another party is liable for a medical claim, saving $1.3 billion.

Rebase Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital Payments:  In 2021, reallocates Medicaid DSH payments to hospitals treating low-income patients, based on states’ actual 2020 allotments (as amended and reduced by the health care law).  Saves $4.1 billion.

Medicaid Anti-Fraud Savings:  Assumes $110 million in savings from a variety of Medicaid anti-fraud provisions, largely through tracking and enforcement of various provisions related to pharmaceuticals.

Amend MAGI Definition:  Amends the health care law to include Social Security benefits in the new definition of Modified Adjusted Gross Income used to determine eligibility for Medicaid benefits.  As previously reported, this “glitch” in the law would make millions of early retirees – who receive a large portion of their income from Social Security – eligible for free taxpayer-funded benefits, and would discourage work by providing greater subsidies to those relying on Social Security, as opposed to wage earnings, for their income.  Saves $14.6 billion.

Flexibility on Benchmark Plans:  Proposes some new flexibility for states to require Medicaid “benchmark” plan coverage for non-elderly, non-disabled adults – but ONLY those with incomes above 133 percent of the federal poverty level (i.e., NOT the new Medicaid population obtaining coverage under the health care law).  No savings assumed.

“Pay-for-Delay:”  Prohibits brand-name pharmaceutical manufacturers from entering into arrangements that would delay the availability of new generic drugs.  Some Members have previously expressed concerns that these provisions would harm innovation, and actually impede the incentives to generic manufacturers to bring cost-saving generic drugs on the market.  OMB now scores this proposal as saving $2.7 billion; when included in the President’s budget back in February, these changes were scored as saving $8.8 billion.

Follow-on Biologics:  Reduces to seven years the period of exclusivity for follow-on biologics.  Current law provides for a twelve-year period of exclusivity, based upon an amendment to the health care law that was adopted on a bipartisan basis in both the House and Senate (one of the few substantive bipartisan amendments adopted).  Some Members have expressed concern that reducing the period of exclusivity would harm innovation and discourage companies from developing life-saving treatments.  OMB now scores this proposal as saving $3.5 billion; when included in the President’s budget back in February, these changes were scored as saving $2.3 billion.

FEHB Contracting:  Proposes streamlining pharmacy benefit contracting within the Federal Employee Health Benefits program, by centralizing pharmaceutical benefit contracting within the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).  Some individuals, noting that OPM is also empowered to create “multi-state plans” as part of the health care overhaul, may be concerned that these provisions could be part of a larger plan to make OPM the head of a de facto government-run health plan.  OMB now scores this proposal as saving $1.6 billion; when included in the President’s budget back in February, these changes were scored as saving $1.8 billion.

Prevention “Slush Fund:”  Reduces spending by $3.5 billion on the Prevention and Public Health Fund created in the health care law.  Some Members have previously expressed concern that this fund would be used to fund projects like jungle gyms and bike paths, questionable priorities for the use of federal taxpayer dollars in a time of trillion-dollar deficits.

State Waivers:  Accelerates from 2017 to 2014 the date under which states can submit request for waivers of SOME of the health care law’s requirements to HHS.  While supposedly designed to increase flexibility, even liberal commentators have agreed that under the law’s state waiver programcritics of Obama’s proposal have a point: It wouldn’t allow to enact the sorts of health care reforms they would prefer” and thatconservatives can’t do any better – at least not under these rules.”  The proposal states that “the Administration is committed to the budget neutrality of these waivers;” however, the plan allocates $4 billion in new spending “to account for the possibility that CBO will estimate costs for this proposal.”

Implementation “Slush Fund:”  Proposes $400 million in new spending for HHS to implement the proposals listed above.

Summary of Health Provisions Offered in Alternative Budgets

Budget Offered by Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA)

Medicaid Block Grant:  Converts both Medicaid and SCHIP into a block grant.  The block grant would be increased annually to reflect population growth as well as the growth of consumer prices; states would gain additional flexibility to manage their Medicaid programs in the way they see fit.

Health Care Law:  Assumes repeal of the law’s coverage expansions scheduled to take effect in 2014.  Also assumes repeal of the law’s tax increases.  A CBO estimate released in February found that taxes will increase by $813 billion over the 2012-2021 period absent their repeal.

Repeals the CLASS Act, which HHS Secretary Sebelius has admitted is “totally unsustainable” as written in the health care law.  Also repeals the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), a board of unelected bureaucrats empowered to enforce caps on Medicare spending that forms the centerpiece of the President’s attempt to reduce Medicare spending.  In addition, the budget presumes the repeal of the drug discount program scheduled to close the Medicare Part D “doughnut hole” in 2020, and repeals $10 billion of the law’s cuts to Medicare Advantage by creating a stabilization fund to preserve private plan choices within Medicare.  Retains most of the health care law’s other Medicare spending reductions, except as specified above.

Medicare “Doc Fix:”  Adjusts the budgetary baseline to reflect a permanent fix to the sustainable growth rate (SGR) mechanism for Medicare physician payment.

Liability Reform:  Assumes health care savings from enacting limits on medical liability suits.  CBO previously estimated that such measures would reduce health expenditures by about 0.5%.

Medicare Bad Debt:  Phases out Medicare payments to hospitals and providers covering bad debt (i.e., unpaid deductibles and co-pays), as recommended by the Fiscal Commission, saving at least $23 billion.

FEHB Reform:  Assumes enactment of CBO Budget Option 14, which reforms the Federal Employee Health Benefits program into a defined contribution model, providing a fixed sum (indexed to consumer price inflation) for federal employees to purchase the health plan of their choosing.  This reform would save $31.4 billion in mandatory spending over ten years, along with potential savings of $41.9 billion in discretionary spending.

 

Budget Offered by Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY)

Medicaid Block Grant:  Converts both Medicaid and SCHIP into a block grant, with initial funding to states set at Fiscal Year 2008 levels.  The block grant would be increased annually to reflect population growth as well as the growth of consumer prices; states would gain additional flexibility to manage their Medicaid programs in the way they see fit.

Health Care Law:  Repeals all of the coverage expansions, tax increases, and Medicare provisions included in the health care law.

Fraud and Abuse:  Assumes $25 billion per year in Medicare savings from waste, fraud, and abuse.

Statement of Medicare Policy:  Includes non-binding language calling for authorizing committees to enact legislation ensuring Medicare’s solvency over a 75-year period while using free market solutions that encourage competition and “individual and family based plans.”  Does not include assumptions about the Medicare “doc fix.”

Updated Summary of President’s Budget Proposals

Apologies for sending a further e-mail, but this revised (hopefully final) summary reflects documents that weren’t available when I sent out my first summary document around lunchtime.  Specifically, the below reflects the Administration’s justifications for reductions and terminations, the HHS Budget in Brief, and the Treasury’s Green Book proposals.

Below is a summary of the changes included in the President’s budget proposal.  As previously indicated, the budget includes $62 billion in mandatory health care savings that would pay for approximately two years of a Medicare “doc fix.”  (However, the budget does NOT specify offsets for the $315.4 billion cost of a “doc fix” beyond 2013.) The $62 billion in savings comes from a “grab bag” of relatively minor tweaks to entitlement spending – the largest of which are $18.4 billion in savings from a reduction in Medicaid provider taxes and $12.9 billion in savings from the pharmaceutical industry, including a shorter exclusivity period for follow-on biologics and provisions to end so-called “pay-for-delay” arrangements.

I’ve also included discretionary request amounts for major HHS divisions below.  These numbers have been updated, and reflect the budget authority proposals included in the HHS Budget in Brief document.  (Some of these numbers are slightly different from the OMB budget document, but it’s not fully clear why – and unfortunately HHS staff weren’t particularly enlightening on this technical detail during their budget briefing.)  Of particular note is the more than $1 billion, 30% increase in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services discretionary program management account – which likely reflects money needed to implement the health care law.  (Remember when Democrats attempted to refute the CBO letter indicating the law would lead to $115 billion in discretionary appropriations?  This 30% increase is a down payment on that $115 billion total…)  Since it’s drawn some attention, I’ll also point out that the Administration proposed eliminating the Graduate Medical Education program for children’s hospitals, which is a discretionary $318 million program run through HRSA. (For more details, see page 16 of the terminations document.)

I didn’t include it in the below summary, but page 97 of the Treasury Green Book “would repeal the additional [1099] information reporting requirements imposed by” the health care law.  However, the Treasury document scores this proposal as costing only $9.2 billion over ten years – far less than the $19 billion cost the Joint Committee on Taxation has previously assigned to 1099 repeal – so it’s unclear whether this discrepancy is a result of the differences in OMB and JCT scoring models, or whether there’s some other explanation.

A final note: Please keep in mind that these proposals were scored by the Office of Management and Budget, not CBO; the specific details on the scoring may change slightly when CBO issues its re-estimate of the budget in a few weeks.  (All numbers in my summary represent 10-year totals, except for the section on discretionary appropriations.)

 

Mandatory Spending

Medicare “Doc Fix”:  Freezes Medicare physician payments under the sustainable growth rate (SGR) mechanism, preventing a scheduled cut of more than 25 percent scheduled to take effect in January 2012.  Total cost of the provision is $369.8 billion over ten years – $54.4 billion in 2012 and 2013, and $315.4 billion in 2014 and succeeding years.  While the cost of the two-year fix is paid for, the $315.4 billion extension beyond 2014 is not – the budget summary tables include a line marked “offsets,” but none are specified in the document.  (Details of the $62.2 billion in pay-fors that would fund a two year fix are listed below.)  Note also that this year’s proposal calls for a ten-year freeze on physician payments; last year’s budget document assumed a 1 percent per year increase, likely explaining its higher cost ($371 billion last year vs. $369.8 billion this year).

Tricare for Life:  Assumes $530 million in new Medicare spending associated with a proposal to shift Uniformed Services Family Health Plan enrollees into Tricare for Life and Medicare.

Transitional Medical Assistance/QI Program:  Provides for temporary, nine-month extensions of the Transitional Medical Assistance program, which provides Medicaid benefits for low-income families transitioning from welfare to work, along with the Qualifying Individual program, which provides assistance to low-income seniors in paying Medicare premiums.  The extensions cost $665 million and $495 million, respectively.

Liability Reform:  The Justice Department portion of the budget calls for $250 million in new mandatory spending – $100 million in fiscal year 2012, followed by $50 million in 2013 through 2015, to “provide incentives for state medical malpractice reform.”  Specific details are unclear, but an article on this issue can be found here.

Discretionary Spending

When compared to Fiscal Year 2010 appropriated amounts, the budget calls for the following changes in discretionary spending by major HHS divisions (tabulated by budget authority):

  • $380 million (13.8%) increase for the Food and Drug Administration;
  • $684 million (9.1%) decrease for the Health Services and Resources Administration;
  • $572 million (14.1%) increase for the Indian Health Service;
  • $580 million (9.0%) decrease for the Centers for Disease Control;
  • $745 million (2.4%) increase for the National Institutes of Health;
  • $1.029 billion (30.6%) increase for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services program management account; and
  • $270 million (86.8%) increase for the discretionary Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control fund.

With regard to the above numbers for CDC and HRSA, note that these are discretionary numbers only.  The Administration’s budget also would allocate $1 billion in mandatory spending from the new Prevention and Public Health “slush fund” created in the health care law, likely eliminating any real budgetary savings (despite the appearance of same in the table referred to above).

Detail to Fund Two Year “Doc Fix” (Total savings of $62.2 billion)

Program Integrity Provisions (Total savings of $32.3 billion)

Medicaid Provider Taxes:  Reduces limits on Medicaid provider tax thresholds, beginning in 2015; the tax threshold would be reduced over a three year period, to 3.5 percent in 2017 and future years.  State provider taxes are a financing method whereby states impose taxes on medical providers, and use these provider tax revenues to obtain additional federal Medicaid matching funds, thereby increasing the federal share of Medicaid expenses paid while decreasing the state share of expenses.  The Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006, enacted by a Republican Congress, capped the level of Medicaid provider taxes, and the Bush Administration proposed additional rules to reform Medicaid funding rules – rules that were blocked by the Democrat-run 110th Congress.  However, there is bipartisan support for addressing ways in which states attempt to “game” the Medicaid system, through provider taxes and other related methods, to obtain unwarranted federal matching funds – the liberal Center for Budget and Policy Priorities previously wrote about a series of “Rube Goldberg-like accounting arrangements” that “do not improve the quality of health care provided” and “frequently operate in a manner that siphons extra federal money to state coffers without affecting the provision of health care.”  This issue was also addressed in the fiscal commission’s report, although the commission exceeded the budget proposals by suggesting that Congress enact legislation “restricting and eventually eliminating” provider taxes, saving $44 billion.  As proposed in the budget, the above provisions would save $18.4 billion.

Medicaid Third-Party Liability:  Strengthens third-party liability provisions allowing Medicaid to recover costs from other insurers, saving $1.6 billion.

High-Risk Products:  Requires states to track high prescribers and utilizers of prescription drugs within Medicaid, saving $3.5 billion. Also creates a system to validate orders for high-risk products and services (e.g., imaging services, DME, home health, etc.), saving an additional $1.8 billion.

MA Repayment Provisions:  Recovers payments to insurers participating in the Medicare Advantage (MA) program.  MA plans are currently paid on a prospective basis, with those payments adjusted according to the severity of beneficiaries’ ill health.  Some sample audits have discovered instances where plans could not retrospectively produce the necessary documentation to warrant the prospective coding adjustment that some beneficiaries received.  The budget would apply this adjustment, currently contemplated for some beneficiaries based on the sample audit, to ALL beneficiaries.  The budget scores this proposal as saving $6.2 billion.

Other Provisions:  Also included in the program integrity section are proposals that would:

  • Require manufacturers to repay states in cases of improper reporting (savings of $125 million);
  • Allow civil monetary penalties for providers who do not update enrollment information (savings of $80 million);
  • Permit the exclusion of officials affiliated with sanctioned entities from participating in health care programs (savings of $50 million);
  • Require prepayment review for all power wheelchairs (savings of $240 million);
  • Use up to 25 percent of Recovery Audit Contractor recoveries to implement anti-fraud actions (savings of $230 million);
  • Provide flexibility to HHS/CMS in using predictive modeling to recover improper and/or fraudulent payments (savings of $100 million); and
  • Limit debt discharges in bankruptcy proceedings associated with fraudulent activity (savings of $150 million).

Provisions without Scoreable Savings:  Included on this list are proposals to:

  • Enforce Medicaid drug price rebate agreements;
  • Increase penalties on drug manufacturers for fraudulent non-compliance with Medicaid drug price rebate agreements;
  • Require drugs to be listed with the FDA in order to be reimbursed under the Medicaid program
  • Prohibit federal funds from being used as a state’s share of Medicaid/SCHIP spending unless specifically authorized;
  • Increase scrutiny of providers receiving Medicare reimbursement through higher-risk banking arrangements;
  • Study the feasibility of using universal product numbers in Medicare to improve payment accuracy; and
  • Strengthen penalties for illegal distribution of Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP identity and billing information

Medicaid Provisions (Total savings of $10.6 billion)

Limit Durable Medical Equipment Reimbursement:  Caps Medicaid reimbursements for durable medical equipment (DME) at Medicare rates.  The health care law extended and expanded a previous Medicare competitive bidding demonstration project included in the Medicare Modernization Act, resulting in savings to the Medicare program.  This proposal, by capping Medicaid reimbursements for DME at Medicare levels, would attempt to extend those savings to the Medicaid program.  Saves $6.4 billion.

Rebase Medicaid Disproportionate Share Hospital Payments:  In 2021, reallocates Medicaid DSH payments to hospitals treating low-income patients, based on states’ actual 2020 allotments (as amended and reduced by the health care law).  Saves $4.2 billion.

Medicare Provisions (Total savings of $6.5 billion)

Quality Improvement Organizations:  Includes several provisions regarding the Quality Improvement Organization (QIO) program within Medicare.  Proposals would require QIO contracts to be determined on a geographic basis to maximize efficiency (savings of $2.2 billion), eliminate conflicts of interest between QIOs’ activities on beneficiary protection and quality improvement (savings of $710 million), expand the eligible pool of QIO contractors (savings of $170 million), extend QIO contract from three to five years (savings of $160 million), and align QIO contract terminations with federal regulations (no savings scored).  Provisions would save $3.1 billion total.

Health IT Penalties:  Re-directs Medicare reimbursement penalties against physicians who do not engage in electronic prescribing beginning in 2020 back into the Medicare program.  The “stimulus” legislation that enacted the health IT provisions had originally required that penalties to providers be placed into the Medicare Improvement Fund; the budget would instead re-direct those revenues into the general fund, to finance the “doc fix” and related provisions.  Estimated savings of $3.2 billion.

Pharmaceutical Provisions (Total savings of $12.9 billion)

Follow-on Biologics:  Reduces to seven years the period of exclusivity for follow-on biologics.  Current law provides for a twelve-year period of exclusivity, based upon an amendment to the health care law that was adopted on a bipartisan basis in both the House and Senate (one of the few substantive bipartisan amendments adopted).  Some Members have expressed concern that reducing the period of exclusivity would harm innovation and discourage companies from developing life-saving treatments.  Saves $2.3 billion over ten years.

“Pay-for-Delay:”  Prohibits brand-name pharmaceutical manufacturers from entering into arrangements that would delay the availability of new generic drugs.  Some Members have previously expressed concerns that these provisions would harm innovation, and actually impede the incentives to generic manufacturers to bring cost-saving generic drugs on the market.  Saves $8.8 billion over ten years.

FEHB Contracting:  Proposes streamlining pharmacy benefit contracting within the Federal Employee Health Benefits program, by centralizing pharmaceutical benefit contracting within the Office of Personnel Management (OPM).  Some individuals, noting that OPM is also empowered to create “multi-state plans” as part of the health care overhaul, may be concerned that these provisions could be part of a larger plan to make OPM the head of a de facto government-run health plan.  Saves $1.8 billion.

A Revised Review of Deficit Reduction Plans

Wanted to follow up my earlier missive this week with a preliminary analysis of the co-chairs’ revised plan.  In general, when compared to the first draft, the revised plan adds the CLASS Act to the list of entitlement programs that must be reformed or repealed, strikes caps on non-economic damages (while retaining other liability reforms), and includes sundry other savings proposals to finance CLASS Act repeal and lower estimated savings from liability reform.  The plan also goes further in reforming – and ultimately repealing – the employee tax exclusion for employer-provided health insurance, echoing some of the proposals made by the Rivlin-Domenici Bipartisan Policy Center plan.  Details of the plan include:

Sustainable Growth Rate:  The plan largely retains the earlier draft’s proposals to pay for a long-term fix to the Medicare physician reimbursement formula though savings elsewhere within Medicare – coupled with the development of a new formula that “encourages care coordination across multiple providers…and pays doctors based on quality instead of quantity of services.”  The final plan provides a bit more specific detail than the draft, proposing a freeze in physician payment levels through 2013 and a one percent cut in 2014.  The final plan also heavily criticizes the SGR mechanism, noting that current budget projections rely on “large phantom savings from a scheduled 23 percent cut in Medicare physician payments that will never occur.”

CLASS Act:  This program – which was not addressed at all in the draft document – is criticized in the report as fiscally dubious: “it is viewed by many experts as financially unsound,” because of the significant adverse selection risks inherent in a voluntary long-term care program.  The report’s conclusion: “Absent reform, the program is therefore likely to require large general revenue transfers or else collapse under its own weight.  [Therefore the] Commission advises the CLASS Act be reformed in a way that makes it credibly sustainable over the long term.  To the extent this is not possible, we advise it be repealed.”  Additional savings to fund the repeal (because the CLASS Act will collect premiums that technically reduce the deficit in its first several years) are suggested in the final report, as outlined below.

Liability Reform:  The final report does recommend reforms on 1) collateral source damages (meaning outside benefits like worker’s comp should be considered when awarding damages), 2) a uniform statute of limitations, 3) joint-and-several liability (defendants only responsible for the portion of damages directly correlating to their share of responsibility), 4) specialized health courts, and 5) safe harbors for providers following best practices.  The plan however does NOT propose a cap on non-economic damages, instead recommending “that Congress consider this approach and evaluate its impact.”  Because the damage caps were removed from the final plan, the estimated deficit reduction under this proposal falls to $17 billion, as opposed to more than $60 billion under the draft proposal.

Employee Tax Exclusion for Employer-Provided Health Insurance:  The tax section of the final plan goes further than the draft, proposing to cap the value of the exclusion at the 75th percentile of premium levels, beginning in 2014.  The cap would NOT be adjusted for inflation after 2018, and the newly capped exclusion would be phased out (the specific details of which are unclear) by 2038.  In exchange, the value of the “Cadillac tax” included in the health care law for years beginning in 2018 would be reduced from 40% to 12%; it is unclear how the “Cadillac” tax would interact with the newly capped exclusion under the proposal.  As part of this tax reform proposal, the existing brackets would be rolled into three brackets, of 12%, 22%, and 28%.  Also of note: The revised plan increases the amount of net revenues devoted to deficit reduction (i.e., net tax increases) from $80 billion per year in the draft plan to $80 billion in 2015 and $180 billion in 2020.

Other Savings Proposals:  To fund SGR reform and CLASS Act repeal, the plan includes a series of savings proposals, many of which appeared in the earlier draft plan (all scores cited are total savings through 2020):

  • Increase in Medicare anti-fraud funding and authority: Not included in the initial draft; saves $9 billion.
  • Reform to Medicare cost-sharing, along with restrictions to supplemental insurance: The final plan takes the initial proposal (a version of CBO’s Budget Option 83) and extends proposed restrictions on first-dollar cost-sharing in Medigap plans to ALL forms of Medicare supplemental coverage, including Tricare for Life, FEHB retirees, and retirees in private employer-sponsored coverage.  The modification saves an additional $38 billion, for a total of $148 billion over ten years.
  • Part D drug rebates:  Similar to the draft plan, the revised version would extend Medicaid pharmaceutical rebates to Part D beneficiaries; however, for reasons that are unclear, the revised plan predicts smaller savings ($49 billion compared to $59 billion in the draft version).
  • Graduate Medical Education:  Reduces both graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments to hospitals, saving a total of $60 billion (compared to $54 billion in the draft plan).
  • Medicare bad debt:  The final plan would phase out over time Medicare payments to hospitals for unpaid cost-sharing owed by beneficiaries, saving $23 billion (compared to $15 billion in the draft plan).
  • Home health:  The plan accelerates savings proposals included in the health care law by beginning productivity adjustments for home health agencies in 2013, and phases in rebasing of the home health prospective payment system by 2015 (instead of 2017 under current law), saving $9 billion through 2020. (The draft plan proposed accelerating Medicare Advantage and DSH cuts in addition to home health reductions, but the final plan omitted MA and DSH provisions.)
  • Medicaid provider taxes:  The plan criticizes as a “tax gimmick” states that utilize provider taxes to receive additional Medicaid federal matching funds, and proposes “restricting and eventually eliminating this practice,” saving $44 billion (down from $49 billion in the draft).
  • Medicaid managed care:  Proposes “giving Medicaid full responsibility for providing health coverage for dual eligibles and requiring that they be enrolled in managed care,” saving $12 billion (compared to $11 billion in the draft).
  • Medicaid administrative costs:  Eliminates federal funding of Medicaid administrative costs “that are duplicative of funds originally included in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grants,” saving $2 billion (down from $17 billion in the draft).
  • FEHB premium support:  Rather than increasing cost-sharing for federal retirees, as the draft proposed, the final plan “recommends transforming the Federal Employees Health Benefits program into a defined contribution premium support plan that offers federal employees a fixed subsidy that grows by no more than GDP plus one percent each year.”  This proposal mirrors the premium support systems that the Rivlin-Ryan and Rivlin-Domenici plans suggested could be applied to Medicare – and the final Simpson-Bowles proposal suggests using the FEHB as a test model for premium support, including a “rigorous external review process to study the outcomes,” with an eye toward a possible premium support program for Medicare.

Other Short-Term Policies:  The final plan also includes a few proposals that do not have a cost/deficit impact.  First, the plan proposes extending the reach of the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB) created in the health care law to all providers, removing the temporary exemptions for some providers included in the law.  The plan also encourages the acceleration of state Medicaid waivers and payment reform options within Medicare, including accountable care organizations.

Long-Term Savings:  The final proposal largely tracks the earlier draft plan’s concept of adopting a cap for all federal health care spending (including Exchange subsidies, Medicare, Medicaid, SCHIP, and the employee health insurance tax exclusion) equal to GDP growth plus one percent from 2020 forward.  The plan also suggests – but does not officially recommend – additional options should spending exceed the targets, including premium support proposals for Medicare, “giving CMS authority to be a more active purchaser of health care services using coverage and reimbursement policy to encourage higher value services,” extending IPAB’s scope beyond Medicare, converting the federal share of Medicaid into a block grant, raising the Medicare retirement age, a “robust” government-run health plan in Exchanges, or an all-payer system for health care.

Health Care Law:  Finally, an interesting passage in the report notes the divergence of opinion among commission members about the new health care law:

Some Commission members believe that the reforms enacted as part of ACA will “bend the curve” of health spending and control long-term cost growth.  Other Commission members believe that the coverage expansions in the bill will fuel more rapid spending growth and that the Medicare savings are not sustainable.  The Commission as a whole does not take a position on which view is correct, but we agree that Congress and the President must be vigilant in keeping health care spending under control and should take further actions if the growth in spending continues at current rates.

Legislative Update on Extenders and 1099

As you may have seen, Sen. Baucus introduced his latest version of tax extenders legislation yesterday.  A summary of health related provisions follows below; however, all these provisions have been included in prior versions of the extenders package.  The Medicare SGR “doc fix” and extension of Medicaid “stimulus” funding were removed, both provisions having been signed into law earlier this year.  The remainders consist of several Medicare-related provisions, as well as a variety of tweaks of and changes to the health care law.  It also includes a $400 million provision (Section 510) adjusting Medicare fee schedule localities in California, which some may view as a legislative earmark.

While Sen. Baucus sought unanimous consent to pass the legislation yesterday, Republicans objected, due to both a lack of time to review the bill and lack of opportunity to offer amendments.  Following that exchange, Sen. Baucus told CongressDaily he expected consideration to take place during a lame duck session.  As a friendly reminder, the Medicare “doc fix” (which is not included in the current extenders package) expires at the end of November; physicians in Medicare face a 23 percent pay cut on December 1, followed by an additional 6.5 percent reduction on January 1.

Separately, Politico reports this morning that the Democrat leadership in the other body is preparing for another vote on a stand-alone 1099 measure, potentially next week.  Apparently the bill will fully repeal the 1099 reporting requirement included in Section 9006 of the health care law – something which Bill Nelson’s amendment, voted on in the Senate this week, did not do.  However, unlike Republican efforts in both the House and Senate to repeal the 1099 reporting requirement, the latest Democrat initiative would paid for by raising other taxes on business.  The article quotes one Democrat staffer as saying this latest 1099 repeal effort is designed “to put Republicans into a corner” by including a new tax on carried interest as a pay-for.

 

340B Program:  Adds inpatient drugs to the 340B outpatient discount program, and maintains childrens hospitals’ ability to participate in the 340B discount program with respect to orphan drugs.

Health Law Clarifications:  Repeals the health law’s delay of the revised skilled nursing facility prospective payment system, as well as the law’s extension of reasonable cost payments for certain laboratory services.  Repeals section 6502 of the law, which requires states to exclude certain providers from Medicaid and SCHIP.  Includes other clarifying amendments with respect to drafting errors in the health care law.

Other Provisions:  Extends for an additional year (through September 30, 2011) the Section 508 hospital reclassification program, at a cost of $300 million over five and ten years.  Provides $175 million in mandatory appropriations to CMS to implement the act’s provisions.  Includes clarifying provisions regarding eligibility for Medicaid health IT funding provided in the “stimulus.”  Provides $400 million to California to adjust Medicare fee schedule localities, and includes clarifying language preventing Medicare providers from un-bundling reimbursement requests.  Includes language regarding affiliated hospitals and language in the health care law surrounding distribution of medical residency positions.

Extenders Update and Revised Health Care Summary

Last night, Sen. Baucus introduced a new substitute; language is attached, along with a redline comparison to “Baucus 2.0,” the substitute introduced last week on which the Senate failed to invoke cloture by a 56-40 vote.  The new substitute DOES include the “doc fix” provisions passed separately by the Senate last Friday as H.R. 3962 – i.e., the six month SGR extension and its pay-fors (IRS-CMS data match and three-day payment rule among them).

The updated substitute extends the Medicaid FMAP assistance provided in the “stimulus,” while reducing the federal match levels.  As a reminder, the “stimulus” provided two categories of enhanced federal funding: an across-the-board increase of 6.2% for all states, along with more targeted assistance focused on states with higher unemployment levels; in both cases the “stimulus” assistance expires on December 31, 2010.  The Baucus substitute would extend the targeted unemployment assistance for a full six months (i.e. through June 30, 2011), while reducing the across-the-board increases – the increase provided to all states for January-March 2011 would be 3.2%, and the increase for April-June 2011 would be 1.2%.  A detailed score is not yet available, but the majority claims this provision will cost $16 billion (down from $24 billion in the earlier versions).

Also of note, the substitute adds a new Section 526, to make inhalation, infusion, and injectable drugs not dispensed through retail community pharmacies subject to the average manufacturer price regime.  Again, a detailed score is not yet available, but the majority claims this provision will save $2.1 billion.

The latest text removes the emergency designation from the Medicaid FMAP increase, as well as the statutory PAYGO exemption from the “doc fix” provisions.  The health subtitle would still add $17.5 billion to the deficit over ten years.

After Sen. Baucus introduced his substitute, Sen. Reid filled the amendment tree and filed cloture on the measure.  As a reminder, barring a unanimous consent agreement, a vote on cloture would occur on Friday, with a vote on passage 30 hours thereafter.

 

Medicare Physician Payment:  Provides a 2.2% increase in reimbursement levels for June-November of 2010.  The legislation also guarantees a further funding “cliff” this December, whereby Medicare payments would be cut by at least 21% absent further Congressional action.  Spends $6.5 billion over five and ten years.

Medicaid Funding:  Includes a six-month extension (through June 30, 2011) of increased federal Medicaid funding provided in the “stimulus.”  Phases down the across-the-board increase in the federal Medicaid match, from the 6.2 percent in the “stimulus” through the end of calendar year 2010 to 3.2 percent in the first calendar quarter of 2011, and 1.2 percent in the second calendar quarter of 2011.  The bill clarifies that states with Section 1115 waivers covering childless adults in effect as of December 31, 2009 qualify for meeting the “stimulus” bill’s maintenance of effort requirements.  The bill also includes a new provision requiring that to obtain the additional six months of federal funding, state chief executive officers must certify “that the state will request and use such additional funds” – language which some may view as a politically motivated stunt.  Spends $16.1 billion over five and ten years.

COBRA Subsidies:  Extends for six months eligibility for COBRA subsidies for individuals laid off through November 30, 2010.  The bill does not extend the length of the subsidy program beyond the current-law 15 months.  The bill designates this spending as emergency appropriations for PAYGO purposes, although it will still add to the deficit.  Raises the deficit by $6.9 billion over five and ten years.

IRS Data Match:  Includes provisions allowing the IRS and CMS to co-ordinate data matching efforts with regard to delinquent tax debts owed by Medicare providers, and to take such information into account when releasing reimbursement payments and accepting new providers.  These provisions were originally included in Section 1303 of the substitute amendment for the reconciliation bill (H.R. 4872), but were stripped out at the House Rules Committee due to Byrd rule concerns.  Saves $175 million over five years and $425 million over ten, according to JCT.

Hospital Payments:  Prohibits Medicare from reopening or adjusting claims made by hospitals during the three days preceding a patient’s inpatient admission.  Saves $4.2 billion over five and ten years.

340B Program:  Adds inpatient drugs to the 340B outpatient discount program, and maintains childrens hospitals’ ability to participate in the 340B discount program with respect to orphan drugs.

Health Law Clarifications:  Repeals the health law’s delay of the revised skilled nursing facility prospective payment system, as well as the law’s extension of reasonable cost payments for certain laboratory services.  Repeals section 6502 of the law, which requires states to exclude certain providers from Medicaid and SCHIP.  Includes other clarifying amendments with respect to drafting errors in the health care law.

“Sweetheart Deal:”  Provides $400 million to California to adjust Medicare fee schedule localities – funds that according to the text of the bill are available only to the state of California.  Some may view this provision as providing a “sweetheart deal” to one specific state.  Costs $400 million over five and ten years.

Average Manufacturer Price:  Makes inhalation, infusion, and injectable drugs not dispensed through retail community pharmacies subject to the average manufacturer price regime.  Saves $800 million over five years and $2.1 billion over ten.

Other Provisions:  Extends for an additional year (through September 30, 2011) the Section 508 hospital reclassification program, at a cost of $300 million over five and ten years.  Provides $175 million in mandatory appropriations to CMS to implement the act’s provisions.  Includes clarifying provisions regarding eligibility for Medicaid health IT funding provided in the “stimulus,” and language preventing Medicare providers from un-bundling reimbursement requests.  Includes language regarding affiliated hospitals and provisions in the health care law surrounding distribution of medical residency positions.

 

UPDATE: New CBO tables were just released; the summary of health provisions with scores has been updated accordingly.  Overall, the bill still increases the deficit by $33.3 billion, and the health subtitle increases the deficit by $17.5 billion.